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Full text of "Annual report"

RULES AND REGULATIONS 
— OF THE — 

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
IPSWICH 



The library will be open every afternoon, except Sundays, Mondays and 
Holidays, from 2 to 6 ; and Wednesday and Saturday evenings from 7 to 9. 

II 

Adult residents of Ipswich are entitled to draw books by filling out 
application blanks. Minors must obtain the signature of parent or guar- 
dian. 

Ill 

Two or more books may be taken out at a time by adults, but only 
one of these may be fiction. Children may take only two books. 

IV 

Cards will be issued to teachers, clergymen, members of study clubs, 
and other special students on which books of non-fiction needed for special 
study may be taken and kept four weeks. 

V 

Books may be kept two weeks (unless labelled Seven day book), and 
may be renewed once for the same length of time. 

Books marked Seven day book cannot be renewed. 

VI 

The last issue of any magazine cannot be taken from the library. 

VII 

A fine of two cents a day (Sundays, Mondays and legal holidays 

excepted) will be imposed on books kept over time, and no other book will 
be delivered to the person incurring the fine until it is paid. 

VIII 

All writing or marking on books, and all injuries beyond a reasonable 
wear shall be promptly adjusted to the satisfaction of the Librarian. A book 
lost must be replaced by the loser. 

IX 

No arrangement for the transfer of a book by the holder or by the 
Librarian will be allowed. 

X 

All persons visiting the library will be required to demean themselves 
in a quiet, orderly manner, and no loud or continued conversation will be 
allowed. 



1G34 1QSO 

REPORT 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF 

IPSWICH, MASS. 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1919 

AND THE 

TWO HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SIXTH YEAR OF THE 
TOWN'S INCORPORATION. 



IPSWICH, MASS. 
G. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS. 
686 



1920 



°o^at 




IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



INDEX. 



PARTL 

PAGE 

Appropriations and Payments 60 

Assessors' Report 83 

Board of Health Report 104 

Bonded Debt . 78 

Cemeteries 53 

Cemetery Trust Funds 62 

Charities 39 

Departmental 8 

Engineers' Report 89 

Health and Sanitation 27 

Highway Department 30 

Overseers' Report 95 

Police Report 86 

Protection Life and Property 18 

Recreation 51 

Reserve Fund 59 

Sealers' Report 91 

Selectmen's Report 99 

Soldier's Benefits 50 

Superintendent of Streets Report 93 



4 S_ IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

PAGE 

Tax Collector's Report 77 

Town Clerk's Report 101 

Town Officers 5 

Town Farm Report 44 

Town Property 82 

Treasurer's Report 70 

Unpaid Bills 79 

Unclassified 55 

PART II. 

Water Commissioners' Report 1 

Electric Light Report 17 



PART III. 



Safbtfl Report 

1 3 

88 

M)I 

8V 

85 

S3 

U8 

en 
rs 

08 

ae 

81 

f ! 

"a 

0.9, 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



TOWN OFFICERS 

SELECTMEN. 
Frank \V. Kyes, Chairman 
Eben B. Moulton 
John A. Brown 

ASSESSORS. 



Term expires 1920 
Term expires 1921 
Term -expires 1922 



John W. N 


ourse, Chairman 


Term 


expires 


1922 


1 Vorge Fall 


Term 


expires 


1921 


Richard R. 


Glasier 

OVERSEERS OF THE 


Term 
POOR. 


expires 


1920 


Frank T. Goodhue, Chairman 


Term 


expires 


1922 


Charles G. 


Hull 


Term 


expires 


1921 


John G. Sperling 


Term 


expires 


1920 




TOWN CLERK. 








Charles W. 


Bamford 


Term 


expires 


1920 




TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 






William J. 


Riley 


Term 


expires 


1920 




TOWN ACCOUNTANT. 






Frederick S. Witham 


Term 


expires 


1922 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 






Herbert W 


. Mason, Chairman 


Term 


expires 


1922 


George E. 


MacArthur 


Term 


expires 


1922 


William J. 


Riley 


Term 


expires 


1921 


Charles H. 


Galligan 


Term 


expires 


1921 


Howard N. 


Doughty 


Term 


expires 


1920 


Luther Wait 


Term 


expires 


1920 



WATER AND LIGHT COMMISSIONERS. 
Arthur H. Walton, Chairman Term expires 1921 

Walter G. Brown Term expires 1922 

William H. Rand Term expires 1920 



[PSWIch town report 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Dr. George E. MacArthur, Chairman Term expires 1921 

Aaron Lord Term expires 1922 

George W. Smith Term expires 1920 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

Charles H. Glasier, Chairman Term expire:-. 1920 

Charles W. Bamford, Clerk Term expires 1920 

Frank H. Girard Term expires 1921 

Lyman H. Daniels Term expires 1922 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Prank T. Goodhue, Chairman Term expires 1922 

James A. Morey Term expires 1921 

Charles H. Wells Term expires 1920 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 

Philip E. Clarke, Chairman Term expires 1921 

Ralph K. Whittier Term expires 1922 

Howard Blake Term expires 1920 

TOWN COUNSEL. 

Frank E. Raymond Term expires 1920 

CHIEF OF POLICE. 
Edward Leavitt 

ENGINEERS OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Arthur H. Walton, Chief; Walter G. Brown, Clerk; 

Edwin M. Poole. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Joseph A. Huckins 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 
G. Loring Woodbury 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 



INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING I 
E. Newton Brown 

CLAM COMMISSIONERS. 

Henry A. Churchill, Chairman Term expires 1921 

E. Warren Dod^e Term expires 1920 

Parley C. Lord Term expires 1922 

FENCE VIEWERS. 

\V;uren Boynton Aaron Lord George H. Green 

FIELD DRIVERS 
Edward Leavitt, V. H. Grant, C. C. Boylan, Jacob Smith 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

William A. Stone 

AUDITOR. 

Frederick S. Witham Term expires 1920 

MODERATOR. 
Charles E. Goodhue 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Charles M. Kelly, Chairman ; George A. Schofield, Secretary ; 

Jesse H. Wade, Thomas R. Lord, Albert Jodrey, Fred 

A. Kimball, Roger S. Warner, M. Charles Arthur, 

George E. Hodgkins. 



EPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



DEPARTMENTAL. 



SELECTMEN. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 

nk W Kyes $200 00 

Bben B Moulton 125 00 

John A Brown 104 10 

George E Hodgkins 20 90 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

('has E Goodhue, moderator $20 00 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 5 26 

J H Lakeman, P M, postage 4 00 

Harvard Envelope Co, envelopes 9 75 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing & advertising 47 90 

Ipswich Chronicle, prntg town reports 340 00 

Essex Book Bindery, binding reports 8 50 

Chas G Hull, printing 51 00 

Samuel D Dodge, use of auto 2 00 

Richard W Davis, use of auto 2 00 

F S Witham, car fare and expense 4 00 

New England T & T Co, telephones 301 82 

A Stanley Wonson, Wire Inspector 258 50 

G A Barker, liability insurance 233 80 

Arthur C Damon, tables 27 00 

Harold C Poor, distributing reports 16 00 

American Railway Ex Co, express 10 61 

Reformatory for Women, flags 15 87 

Lathrop Bros, moving 12 00 



$450 00 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 9 

Paid to 
-hA\n V Dupray, posting warrants and 

use of auto 7 00 

C C Boylan, posting warrants and use auto 43 00 



Klmer C Smith, painting 






16 


70 




Willis L Augur, ringing bell ; 


and painting 


43 


00 




"Walter E Scott, cigars 






20 


00 




H B McArdle, supplies 






2 


50 




People's Ex Co., express 








79 




Clerk of the Courts, fee 






3 


00 




Wm J Riley, cash paid out 








75 




Edward Leavitt, dog officer 






10 


00 




Geo A Schofield, services Bay St Hearings 


290 


00 




John F Wippich, care town 


clock 




25 


00 


1,831 75 










Total expenditures 


$2,281 75 


Unexpended balance 








- 


12 62 




$2,294 37 


Appropriation 




$2,27 




Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 




19 


37 














$2,294 37 



AUDITING AND ACCOUNTING. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
Frederick S Witham, auditor ' $150 00 

Frederick S Witham, accountant 1,200 00 



$1,350 00 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

H B McArdle, supplies $10 70 



10 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

Paid to 

(lias G Hull, printing 40 75 

Brown-Howland Co., supplies 16 50 

Royal Typewriter Co., supplies 30 

F J Edwards, typewriter repairs 15 00 

Adams, Cushing & Foster, Inc., supplies 3 07 

Kee Lox Mfg Co., supplies 1 00 

F E Wood, trucking 75 

F S Witham, car fares and expense 12 00 

Amer Railway Ex Co., express 50 

Dalton Adding Machine Co., repairs 1 75 

102 32 



Total expenditures $1,452 32 

Unexpended balance 47 68 



$1,500 00 
Appropriation $1,500 00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Wm J Riley, Treasurer and Collector $1800 00 
Grace G Bamford, Clerk 853 00 



$2653 00 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 

Harvard Envelope Co., envelopes $ 9 75 
First National Bank, checks and check 

register 39 15 

Chas S Garrette, supplies 2 30 
Ipswich Chronicle, prntg and advertising 34 35 

Chas G Hull, printing 19 50 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 11 



Paid to 








Win J Riley, car fares and expense 


15 


75 




H B McArdle, supplies 


2 


00 




Dalton Adding Machine Co., repairs 


4 


28 




American Railway Ex Co., express 


1 


65 




Frank E Raymond, services 


15 


00 




Bureau of Statistics, cert, of notes 


14 


00 




G A Barker, premium on bond 


200 


00 




Banker & Tradesman, subscription 


5 


00 




Todd Protectograph Co., repairs 




50 




Geo A Schofield, services 


15 


00 




Underwood Typewrtr Co., Inc., typwriter 102 


50 




Dalton Adding Mach Co., adding mach 


140 


00 


620 73 








Total expenditures 


$3273 73 


Unexpended balance 






1 27 




$3275 00 


Appropriation 






$3275 00 


ASSESSORS. 




SALARIES. 








Paid to 








John W Nourse 


$352 48 




Richard R Glasier 


150 00 




George Fall 


150 00 










$652 48 








OTHER EXPENSES. 








Paid to 








Franklin N Pratt, blanks 


$ 


75 





12 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 






John W Nourse, copying valuation books 


40 00 




Wright & Potter Prntg Co., blanks 


2 75 




Wakefield Daily Item, blanks 


8 75 




Lilla D Stott, abstracts 


37 12 




Hobbs & Warren, commitment books 


40 00 




Ipswich Chronicle, prntg poll tax lists 


80 00 




John W Nourse, cash paid out, team 






and car fares 


14 02 




Samuel D Dodge, use of auto 


17 50 




P S Witham, car fares and expense 


6 00 




Amer Railway Ex Co., express 


63 


$247 52 


\ 




Total expenditures 


$900 00 


Appropriation 




$900 00 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
Prank E Raymond, Toavu Counsel 
Albert P Welsh, Town Counsel 



OTHER EXPENSES. 



Paid to 
Jackson & Jackson, services 
Geo H W Hayes, services 
Albert F Welsh, services 
Edward B O'Brien, services 



$66 67 
33 33 



$ 15 00 
50 00 
70 00 
75 00 



$100 00 



[PSWICB TOWN KKPORT 13 



Paid to 






Frank E Raymond, services 


410 00 









$620 00 


Total expenditures 




$720 00 


Unexpended balance 




36 67 






$756 67 


Appropriation 


$300 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1918 bill 


50 00 




Transfer from Reserve Fund 


406 67 




«.- 




$756 67 


TOWN CLERK. 




SALARIES. 






Paid to 


i 




Chas W Bamford, Town Clerk 


$350 00 


$350 00 






OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






P B Murphy, blanks 


$ 4 70 




Ipswich Chronicle, printing 


3 55 




E J M Scahill, death returns 


29 25 




Geo G Bailey, M D, birth returns 


22 25 




M C McGinley, M D, birth returns 


10 25 




E C Steeves, M D, birth returns 


1 00 




Carter's Ink Co., ink 


4 00 




American Railway Ex Co., express 


52 




Chas W Bamford, recording and indexing 




births, marriages and deaths 


133 40 


$208 92 







14 IPSWICH TOWX RKPORT 



Total expenditures 




$558 92 


Unexpended balance 




234 33 


v 


$793 25 


Appropriation 


$750 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 


43 25 


$793 25 




NATION. 


ELECTION AND REGISTE 




SALARIES. 






Paid to 






Chas H Glasier, Registrar 


$50 00 




Frank H Girard, Registrar 


50 00 




Lyman H Daniels, Registrar 


50 00 




Chas W Bamford, Registrar 


50 00 


$200 00 


* « 




ELECTION OFFICERS. 






Paid to 






Stephen R Harris 


$13 00 




Geo W Smith 


13 00 




« Geo A Schofield, Jr 


13 00 




John H Peatfield 


5 00 


- 


Frank E Howe 


10 25 




Frank H Girard 


10 25 




J Frank Austin 


8 25 




D A MacKinnon 


3 00 




John R Morris 


3 00 




Lyman H Daniels 


6 00 




Clarence Pickard 


3 00 




John C Chisolm 


3 00 




Chas H Glasier 


6 00 





IPSWICH TOWX HKPORT 15 



Paid to 






Michael J Lucey 


6 00 




A H Walton 


13 00 




Geo A Schofield 


6 00 




G Henry Curtis 


5 25 




Chas A Mallard 


5 25 




Alfred H Pickard 


2 25 




Fred F Byron 


2 25 




J J Jedrey 


5 25 




Frank W Kyes 


10 00 




Eben B Moulton 


10 00 




John A Brown 


10 00 




Edward C Brooks 


3 00 






-— — 


$175 00 


OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






Ipswich Chronicle, prntg & advertising 


$114 90 




Fred R Hull, printing 


5 00 




H A Russell, meals 


33 95 


$153 85 






Total expenditures 




$528 85 


Unexpended balance 




21 15 






$550 00 


Appropriation 




$550 00 



TOWN HALL. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Alonzo L Brown, janitor $700 00 

Wm H Jewett, janitor 225 00 



L< 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 

Harold C Poor, janitor . 30 00 

J H Sheppard, labor 16 00 

Wm H Goditt, labor 2 00 

Harold C Poor, labor 10 00 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Lathrop Bros., fuel 
Ipswich Gaslight Co., gas 
Chas L Lovell, fuel. 
Electric Light Dept., light 
H C Poor, supplies 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies 
Hiller & Co., supplies 
Electric Light Dept., supplies 
Brainard J Conley, supplies 
Dustbane Mfg Co., supplies 
Mass. Commission for Blind, brooms 
Geo E Brown, sand 
Chas W Brown, repairs 
George Hayes, plumbing 36 12 

Austin L Lord, masonry 5 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 1 

Clarence Cheever, repairs 2 

Joseph A King, repairs 2 

Edwin M Poole, repairs 2 

Elmer C Smith, painting 25 75 

J W Webber, carpentry 18 00 

A J Brennan, plumbing 50 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 13 86 

Tohn T Hubbard, repairs 6 50 



$135 70 

80 20 

76 85 

716 44 

53 

14 22 

6 38 

8 10 

4 20 

17 00 

10 46 



00 
65 



52 

88 
50 
70 
50 



$983 00 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 



Paid to 
Robt Robertson Co., heater repairs 
New Eng- T & T Co., telephones 
Geo B Robbins Co., disinfect ant 
F E Wood, removing ashes 
J L Hammett Co., supplies 
W A Stone, Sealer, sealing fee 
J J Merrill, supplies 
Peoples Express, Inc., express 
Water Dept., water 
[pswich News Co., piano 
Damon & Damon, insurance 
Geo A Schofield, insurance 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Mabel Andrews, laundry 
A L Brown, laundry 
John H Plunkett, Chief, boiler inspection 



Total expenditures $2775 77 

Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 

Transfer from Out Poor Dept. 

$2775 77 



153 


42 


66 


76 


25 


00 


29 


00 


8 


25 


1 


00 


25 


35 


1 


26 


11 


99 


125 


00 


22 


50 


74 40 


47 


63 




70 


4 


95 


>n 2 


00 


$2300 00 


39 


57 


231 


08 


. 205 


12 



$1792 77 



18 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Protection Persons and Property, 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 
Edward Leavitt, chief 
Valorous H Grant, patrolman 
Clifford C Boylan, patrolman 
Jacob Smith, patrolman 
John F Dupray, patrolman 
Jesse J Jedrey, special 
Herbert Whittier, special 
Win H Goditt, special 
Harold C Poor, special 
Alfred Langmaid, special 
Al ouzo L Brown, special 
Harold C Poor, keeper of lockup 
Wm H Jewett, keeper of lockup 
Wm H Goditt, keeper of lockup 
Jesse J Jedrey, keeper of lockup 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
D A Grady, use of auto 
S D Dodge, use of auto 



$1402 14 


1345 


70 


1353 


04 


1167 


15 


74 25 


152 


64 


305 


29 


299 


38 


53 


64 


12 


75 


16 


50 


57 


00 


4 


00 


37 


00 


30 


00 


$83 25 


63 00 



$6310 48 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 19 

Paid to 

R W Davis, use of auto 37 50 

E W Dodge, use of auto 2 50 

C C Boylan, use of auto - 22 00 

Omer Godin, use of auto 8 25 

A H Warner, use of auto 4 00 

A L Brown, boat hire 5 00 

K E Currier, use of auto 1 50 

R W Davis, supplies 5 05 

Allen Bros., equipment G 05 

J H Lakeman, P M, postage 9 40 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 22 50 

Xew England T & T Co v telephones 70 53 

V H Grant, car fare and expense 3 28 

H C Poor, car fare and expense 4 75 

Wm H Goditt, car fare and expense 4 29 

Geo G Dexter, photographs 7 00 

H A Russell, meals 29 65 

John W Goodhue, supplies 6 25 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 47 81 

C S Tyler, supplies 12 00 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 7 13 

M C McGinley, M D, services 14 50 

Geo G Bailey, M D, services 2 00 

Wm A Spiller, repairs 1 00 

A C Damon, supplies 8 00 
Wm A Banfill, painting , 5 25 

B J* Conley, supplies 1 10 
Edward Leavitt,, cash paid out for 
special out of town officers, 

liquor raids 203 65 

$698 19 



20 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 





$7008 67 




33 




$7009 00 


$5200 00 




9 00 




1800 00 






$7009 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 

Engineers $320 00 

Hose Co. No. 1 and H & L Co. 958 44 

Hose Co. No. 2 316 67 

Chester Patch, engineer 25 00 

Fred C Rust, fireman 25 00 

Edward H Smith, chauffeur 976 60 

Lester Wood, chauffeur 339 00 

Thos R Roberts, chauffeur 27 00 

Arthur F Burnham, asst chauffeur 159 00 

Samuel W Atherley, asst chauffeur 4 50 

Sundry Persons, still alarms 29 55 

John R Morris, janitor 261 00 

Chas H Wells, janitor 54 00 





HORSES. 




Paid to 






F E Wood 




$100 66 


Highway Department 




200 00 



$3495 76 



$300 66 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 21 

EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

Paid to 

American La France Fire Eng Co., sup $ 8 75 

J J Merrill, maint and repairs fire alarm 460 33 

Angus I Savory, supplies 16 00 

Myer & Porter, supplies & repairs 134 98 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 23 97 

Pierce, Butler & Pierce Mfg Co., supplies 2 95 

C S Tyler, supplies 28 06 

American Railway Ex Co., express 2 17 

Walter F Poole, supplies 3 20 

Western Union Tel Co., time service 20 25 

Marcorelle Bros., supplies 40 09 

A C Damon, supplies 5 00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies 7 31 

J J Merrill, supplies 78 18 

C O Bishop, painting 1 00 

John E Dodge, painting 8 00 

G C Fiske, supplies 4 36 

B J (Tonley, supplies 2 00 

N J Bolles, supplies 80 

Peoples Express, Inc., express 53 

Electric Light Dept., supplies 4 27 

John W Goodhue, supplies 5 28 

Boston Feather Duster Co., supplies 13 00 

Ipswich Mills, repairs and supplies 66 30 

Lester Wood, cash paid out 3 00 

Fiske & Blanchard, supplies 5 04 

Geo E Marsh Co., supplies 8 22 

F E Wood, trucking 3 04 

Almy, Bigelow & Washburn, tires 384 45 

— $1340 53 



22 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 




FUEL AND LIGHT. 






Paid to 






A H Peatfield 


$ 61 00 




(/has L Lovell 


153 83 




Lathrop Bros. 


113 46 




George Fall 


288 73 




Electric Eight Dept. 


177 58 


$794 60 






MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 




Paid to 






Austin L Lord, masonry 


$ 6 54 




Dustbane Mfg Co., dustbane 


4 00 




Water Dept., water 


12 00 




Harry E Rhoades, painting 


12 50 




Chas Jewett, labor 


4 50 




George Hayes, plumbing 


32 16 




John H Plunkett, Chief boiler inspec 


00 




Reuben Andrews, labor 


80 


$74 50 






PENSION. 






Paid to 






Agnes K Gilmore 


$300 00 


$300 00 






OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






Win B Richards, teaming 


$ 5 50 




Ipswich Chronicle, cards 


20 




F E Wood, trucking 


3 27 




Geo B Robbins Co., supplies 


6 75 




F R Starkey, supplies 


3 36 




H W Phillips, supplies 


6 75 




A Storey Brown, rent of land 


4 00 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 






Paid to 
New Eng T & T Co., telephones 



Total expenditures 
D n expended balance 



130 63 



Appropriation 



$160 46 

$6466 51 
3 49 

$6470 00 
$6470 00 



FOREST WARDEN. 

FIGHTING FIRES. 

Paid to 
Sundry Persons, labor $58 15 

Harold G Jenks, use of auto 1 20 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 


$59 35 
40 65 


Appropriation 


$100 00 
$100 00 


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

SALARIES. 

Paid to 
Wm A Stone, Sealer $140 30 


<feid.n sn 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Hobbs & Warren, record books $ 5 14 

J H Lakeman, P M, postage 2 00 

Ipswich Chronicle, prntg and advertising 5 00 



24 IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 



Paid to 






Harold C Poor, use of auto 


6 50 




F E Wood, use of team 


31 50 




Wm A Stone, car fares and expense 


9 19 




W & L E Gurley, equipment 


39 34 




Dover Stamping & Mfg Co., equipment 


15 00 




C F Chapman & Son, supplies 


25 




John W Goodhue, supplies 


1 35 




American Railway Ex Co., express 


68 


$115 95 




- 


Total expenditures 


$256 25 


Appropriation 


$210 00 




Transfer from Reserve Fund 


46 25 


$256 25 




T. 


MOTH DEPARTMEN 




SALARIES AND WAGES 






Paid to 






James A Morey, Superintendent 


$1078 18 




John Floyd, labor 


710 00 




Alvery Marriott, labor 


368 24 




Harry Rutherford, labor 


175 43 




Augustus McGinnis, labor 


693 08 




John Cronin, labor 


5 60 




Alfred Gallant, labor 


47 34 




Alfred Wade, labor 


38 00 




Frank T Goodhue, labor 


12 80 




Fred Buzzell, labor 


91 70 




Orrin Leno, labor 


18 59 




Frank McGinnis, labor 


12 00 




Silas Stone, labor 


• 68 40 





IPSWICH TOWN RUPORT 25 



Paid to 






Chester Stone, labor 


70 90 




James Burns, labor 


62 00 


$3452 26 


OTHER EXPENSES. 






Paid to 






James A Morey, use of truck 


$192 50 




F E Wood, use of teams 


317 06 




Minnie Dort, rent 


60 00 




FitzHenry-Guptill Co., supplies 


1 05 




E E Currier, supplies 


26 22 




Mayer & Porter, supplies 


12 85 




E L Blaisdell, trucking 


5 25 




F E Wood, trucking and freight 


10 70 




American Railway Ex Co., express 


1 18 




Joseph A King, repairs 


3 75 




Chas W Bamford, administering oaths 


13 50 


$644 06 






Total expenditures 


$4096 32 


Balance 1918 appropriation 


$2343 53 




Private Work-Moth Tax 


1658 05 




Appropriation, Dec, 1919 


94 74 


$4096 32 






TREE WARDEN. 




SALARIES AND WAGES 






Paid to 






James A Morey, labor 


$120 00 




John Floyd, labor 


80 80 




Augustus McGinnis, labor 


80 80 




Fred Buzzell, labor 


28 80 





$310 40 



26 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
D A Grady, use of team 
James A Morey, use of truck 
F E Wood, use of team 
Minnie Dort, rent 
Joseph A King, repairs 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Geo H Lord, filing saws 
Angus I Savory, supplies 



$ 4 00 


27 


50 


13 


75 


12 


00 


5 


60 


14 75 


2 


55 


7 


86 



$88 01 



Total expenditures $398 41 

Unexpended balance 1 59 



$400 00 
Appropriation . $400 00 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 27 



Health and Sanitation* 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. - 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 

Geo E MacArthur, M D $100 00 

George W Smith 75 00 

Aaron Lord 75 00 



OTHER GENERAL EXPENSES 

Paid to 
J H Lakeman, P M, postage 
Hobbs & Warren, blanks 
Ipswich Chronicle, prntg & advertising 
Times Publishing Co., blanks 
New England T & T Co., telephones 
American Railway Ex Co., express 
E M Dow, carpentry, Influenza Camp 
F E Wood, trucking 
H W Norris, garbage collection 
D A Grady, teams 
C C Boylan, killing cats 
Wm H Goditt, killing cats 
V H Grant, killing cats 
M S Turner, services as nurse 



ES. 

$ 27 74 


1 


00 


7 


50 


2 


25 


79 


63 


2 


86 


202 


84 


2 25 


249 


92 


23 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 




50 


25 


00 



$250 00 



IPSAVICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 
Wm J Riley, cash paid out 
C C Boylan, services 
Ainer Pub Health Asso., membership fee 
Gable Hospital, board 
Samuel C Gordon, trucking 
P E Raymond, services 
Aaron Lord, cash paid out 
John W Goodhue, supplies 
Geo A Schofield, services 





31 


2 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 


45 00 


10 


00 


1 


54 


1 


07 


35 


00 



QUARANTINE AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

Paid to 
Geo E MacArthur, M D, services 
8 ite Bd of Charity, board & care 
City of Salem, board and care 
City of Boston, board and care 
Win H Goditt, guard duty 
J J Jedrey, guard duty 
Alonzo L Brown, guard duty 
Alfred Langmaid, guard duty 
Harold C Poor, guard duty 
H O Whittier, guard duty 
Jacob Smith, guard duty 
C C Boylan. guard duty 
V H Grant, guard duty 
Chas G Spiller, clothing 
\Ym A Burnham, loss of wages 
Alexander LeClair, loss of wages 
EJM Scahill, fumigation 



$ 55 00 


179 


00- 


■2-24 


36 


56 


00 


7 


50 


36 


00 


37 


13 


43 


50 


130 


13 


42 


00 


6 


00 


9 


00 


7 


50 


4 26 


30 


00 


38 


00 


143 50 



$739 91 



$1048 88 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 20 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

Paid to 
Salem Asso. Prev Tuber, board 
State Bd of Charity, hoard and care 
City of Lynn, board and care 
Geo E MacArthur, M I), services 
John J Moriarty, M D, services 
City of Haverhill, aid 
F W Herri ck, use of auto 



$ 27 


00 


44 


00 


LIS 


00 


7 


00 


55 


00 


22 


50 


15 


00 



$175 


00 


263 


36 


241 


64 


2 


50 


525 


00 


2 


00 



$288 50 



CHILD WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid to 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing $ 7 70 

Philip Ewing, labor 3 00 

Wm. B Richards, labor 3 50 

Geo E MacArthur, M D, services 150 00 

$164 20 

INSPECTION. fc 

Paid to 
G Loring Woodbury, Insp of Animals 
E3 Newton Brown, Insp of Slaughtering 
Geo W Smith, Milk Inspector 
Chas G Hull, printing 
Aaron Lord, Sanitary Agent 
Geo E MacArthur, use of auto 

$1209 50 

Total expenditures $3700 99 

Unexpended balance 1 85 

$3702 84 
$3702 84 



Appropriation $3500 00 

Appropriation unpaid 1918 Bills 202 84 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Highway Department* 



GENERAL ADM [NISTRATION 

Paid to 
Joseph A Huckins, • Supt of Streets 
Amelia M Clarke, typewriting 
Chas S Garrette, supplies 
F E Wood, cartage and freight 
Amer Railway Ex Co., express 
H B McArdle, suppli' 
Eastman & Bradford, surveying 
Boston & Maine R R. freight 
County of Essex, fee 
Geo G Dexter, frame 
Geo A Schofield, liability insurance 
Geo E Hodgkins, liability insurance 
E L Blaisdell, trucking 
Mass Highway Commission, re^is fe 
Geo A Schofield, services 

STREET REPAIRS. 

L\BOR AND TEAMS. 

Paid to 
John Amero $435 00 



$1500 00 


1 


50 


3 


50 


3 


15 




79 


4 


22 


132 


67 


10 


00 


3 


00 




60 


473 89 


78 


50 


6 


42 


2 


06 


7 


00 



$2227 30 



IPSWICH TOW N REPORT 31 

Paid to 

Tf 

Wilfred Atherley 3 60 
Edward Bodwell . , 288 16 

A Story Brown 301 15 

Antony Burek 206 80 

John Blunda 163 40 

Chas G Brown 45 90 

Chas W Barton ' 20 24 

James Burns 3 20 

Ernest Carter 975 36 o 

Wm O Conant 694 50 

Fred A Cross 49 80 

Carl A Caverly 136 35 

Thomas Cummings 57 32 

George' B Courtis 14 40 

Patrick D onion . 3 80 

Carl Ellsworth 225 40 

Paul Garrette 1176 00 

Everett Guilford 701 88 

Walter F G6uld 21 44 

Leander Goditt* 119 50 

A N Jewett 3 20 

Rees Jenkins 558 90 

Stanley Kmeich 3 20 

John D Kelley 286 44 

Louis Kelley 5 50 

Henry Lavoie 58 40 

Adam G Lauer 183 25 

Lathrop Bros. 360 00 

William Leavitt 155 25 

Irving Manzer 296 92 

H W Norris 72 12 






IPSWKTT TOWN KKPORT 



Paid to 




Joseph Phaneuf 


377 50 


J F Putnam 


44 20 


D S Perley 


470 05 


Lyman Perley 


78 72 


W L Phillips 


115 20. 


John J Riley 


118 60 


James Ryan 


62 20 


Frank Scahill 


794 17 


Albert M Sheppard 


780 14 


Thomas Szack 


367 24 


George Sanborn 


2 20 


Wm L Stone 


54 50 


Charjes Strout 


149 20 % 


Joseph Stinson 


9P 60 


James Sheppard 


408 76 


Turner Hill Farm 


168 01 


Harry Wilkinson 


828 92 


Lester Wood 


312 00 


Edmund Wile 


158 40 


Collins York 


276 50 


Adam Zuch 


233 24 




<fcTWS 73 




'P X • J c/ — fJ 1 'J 


GRAiEL, SAND, OIL, ETC. 




Paid to 




Benjamin R Horton 


$ 1 25 


The Barrett Co. 


178 07 


Standard Oil Co. of N Y 


369 13 


The Texas Co. 


448 00 


Nicholas Pappayanopoulos 


6 50 


A Story Brown 


3 00 


The Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 


30 14 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 33 



59 


25 


4 


00 


22 


40 


1 


13 


173 


95 


11 


50 


7 


84 


7 


35 


5 


20 


615 


30 


59 


85 


8 


55 



Paid to 
Adam G Lauer 
Tilton Bros. 
James Sheppard 
Chas L Lovell 
D S Perley 
Lillian G Stanford 
Canney Lumber Co. 
Turner Hill Farm 
William Goodhue 
Angie P Brown 
Est. Eugene Sullivan 
N R Underhill 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

Paid to 

E E Currier, supplies $187 64 

N J Bolles, supplies 3 35 

Joseph A King, repairs 93 25 

Angus I Savory, supplies 60 44 

Chas L Lovell, fuel and supplies 127 48 

Water Dept,, water 80 00 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 61 25 

( ! F 1 Chapman & Son, supplies 15 60 

Canney Lumber Co., lumber 349 11 

Mayer & Porter, repairs and supplies 224 35 

John W Goodhue, supplies 133 38 

R W Davis, Supplies 60 52 

Puritan Iron Works, supplies 34 00 

Chas G Hull, painting 22 00 

Walter F Poole, supplies 6 48 

Dyar Supply Co., grader 303 60 



$2012 41 



U IPSWICH TOWX REPORT 



Paid to 


• • 






o H Lord, filing saV 


1 






X E Road Mach Co., supplies 


10 


32 




I) A Grady, paint 


5 


00 




A J Barton & Son. labor 


12 


35 




Lathrop Bros., fuel 


13 94 




George Hayes, labor 




10 




Robt Spencer, labor 


9 


;:> 




Wm F Rutherford, laboi 


4 


00 


\ 


J J Merrill, suppli 


1 


13 




Thos H Reedy, masonry 


6 


00 




J F Pope & Son,' lumber 




58 




John A Brown, brick 


28 


00 




Austin Lord, masonry 


110 


20 




F E Wood, trucking 


2 


24 




Boston & Maine R R. demurrage 


8 


51 




Frank A Chase, surveying 


16 


50 


$2045 


BUOYS 








Paid to 








E Warren Dodge, care of buoy^ 


$195 00 




Ernest Peabody, care of buo 


12 


00 




John W Goodhue, supplies 




16 


$207 16 








FLOATS. 








Paid to 








Herbert F Goodhue, labor 


$23 60 




Fred MeGilvery, labor 


6 


00 


$29 60 








SIDEWALKS. 








W E Bassett, labor 


$341 15 










$341 15 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



SNOW AND ICE. 



J ..AMOR AND TEAMS. 



Paid to 
firnest Carter 
Carl Ellsworth 
Paul Garrette 
Chas Henley 
Chas Jewett 
Rees Jenkins 
Henry Lavoie 
Frank Scahill 
Albert M Sheppard 
Chas Strout 
Harry Wilkinson 
Frank E Wood 
Collins York 
Wm Stone, Jr 



STABLE. 



John A Brown, hay 

Wm G Horton, grain 

Geo B* Brown, grain 

I) S Perley, hay 

A Story Brown, hay 

Win McCarthy, shoeing 

Angus I Savory, supplies 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 

W A Snow Iron Works, supplies 

J E Greene, carpentry 

Water Dept., water 

B J Conley, supplies 



$46 40 


1 


80 


42 


00 


4 


05 


8 


60 


5 


40 


16 


00 


45 


50 


6 


50 


4 


00 


44 


90 


5 


70 


42 


00 


1 


60 


$273 34 


346 


11 


254 26 


412 


47 


184 79 


251 


05 


5 


37 


76 


14 


64 75 


7 


00 


49 


93 


1 


35 



$269 45 



IPSWICH TOAVX REPORT 



Paid to 


■ 




John W Goodhue, supplies 


4 09 


si 930 65 






Total expenditures 


$22589 o 7 


Appropriation 


$19000 00 




Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 


54 78 




Note Appropriation 


2500 00 




Transfer from Out Poor Dept. 


1034 49 






TTIOX. 


122589 27 


ESSEX ROAD CONSTBI 




LABOR AND TEAMS. 






Paid to 






Veto Amario 


$ 83 50 




Edward Bodwell 


211 00 




A Story Brown 


482 85 




Electric Light Dept. 


43 20 




Wm S Evans 


222 30 




Everett Guilford 


10 62 




Chas Henley 


82 50 




Rees Jenkins 


8 10 




John D Kelley 


171 14 




Louis Kelley 


100 25 


. 


Henry Lavoie 


195 14 




Benjamin Lapoto 


33 00 




Frank Murowski 


52 50 




John McLaughlin 


96 00 




Daniel McGuire 


4 00 




Frank Scahill 


314 97 




Albert M Sheppard 


4 00 




Thomas Szack 


267 38 





V.'ini TOWN RKPORT 



Paid to 
'. lias Strout 
Robert Spencer 
Harry Wilkinson 
Edmund Wile 
Vdam Zueh 



OTHER EXPENSES. 



Paid to 
Standard Oil Co., oil 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Boston & Maine R R, freight 
John W Goodhue, pipe and supplier 
Joseph A King, repairs 
Thos H Reedy, blasting 
N J Bolles, supplies 
Robt Spencer, laying wall 
Walter F Poole, supplies 
Chas L Lovell, supplies 
Edwin M Poole, carpentry 



146 


96 




90 


8 


00 


427 


50 


130 


63 


$216 00 


7 






71 


230 




12 


30 


38 


58 


8 


40 


188 


96 


2 


05 


3 


27 


4 


00 



$3234 44 



$711 57 



Total expenditures $3946 01 

Unexpended balance 593 10 



$4539 11 



Balance from 1918 
Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 

ftbursement from Highway Com. 
Reimbursement from County of Essex 



$ 15 


91 


2000 


00 


123 


20 


1200 


00 


1200 


00 



$4539 11 



3x 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 



EAGLE HILL ROAD REPAIRS. 

LABOR AM) TEAMS. 



Paid to 



Echvard Bodwell 


$3 60 




Antony Burek 


43 60 




Carl Ellsworth 


40 40 




Rees Jenkins 


114 30 




John D Kelley 


14 96 




Thomas Szack 


48 4D 




James Sheppard 


98 10 




Edmund Wile 


14 40 




Adam Zuch 


40 00 




Total expenditures 




$417 76 


Unexpected balance 




82 24 




$500 00 


Balance from 1918 appropriation 




$500 00 


BLAISDELL AVENUE 






Paid to 






Everett Guilford, labor 


$37 50 




John D Kelley, labor 


63 56 




Frank Scahill, labor 


31 96 




Albert M Sheppard, labor 


80 06 




Harry Wilkinson, labor 


79 16 




Angie P Brown, gravel 


43 75 




Fred A Nason, land damage 


75 00 




Total expenditures 




$410 99 


Unexpended balance 




89 01 




$500 00 


Appropriation 




$500 00 



IPS \Y I CI I TOWN RKPORT 39 



CHARITIES, 



OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

Paid to 

Frank T Goodhue, salary $100 00 

John G Sperling, salary 75 00 

Chas G Hull, salary 75 00 

D A Grady, auto hire 4 50 

Chas G Hull, printing 6 34 

New England T & T Co., telephones 115 81 

Frank E Raymond, services 25 00 

E W Dodge, auto hire 4 00 

Boston & Maine R R, mileage books 64 80 

Chas C Canney, auto hire 2 00 

S D Dodge, auto hire 2 00 

R W Davis, auto hire 6 00 

Chas G Hull, salary as Agent 200 00 



CASH ALLOWANCES. 

Paid to 
Sundry Persons, cash $1991 00 



$680 45 



$1991 00 



40 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 



RENT. 



Paid to 
George Tibbetts 
Lucretia S Lord 
Walter F Gould 



$10 00 

19 50 

9 00 



GROCERIES 


AND PROVISIONS. 




Paid to 








Wm P Reilly 




$136 20 


M M Wiezbicki 




162 


71 


Marcorelle Bros. 




69 


62 


E E Gray Co. 




55 


93 


Walter F Poole 




119 


06 


Co-op. Grocery Stores 


Co. 


• 

4 


99 


Titcomb & Co. 




2 


00 


F R Starkey 




4 


83 


E C Lord 




20 


46 


Tongas & Tougas 







00 




FUEL. 




Paid to 








Chas L Lovell 




$53 


60 


A H Peatfield 




40 


10 


Lathrop Bros. 




33 


40 


George Fall 




22 75 



BOARD AND CAR! 

Paid to 

Mamie E Kneeland $78 00 

A I Armstrong 5 00 

Mrs George Healey 8 50 

Ipswich Branch, Red Cross 182 00 



$38 50 



$584 80 



$149 85 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 41 

Paid to 
State Bd of Charity 31 43 

$304 9:', 



MEDICINE 


AND MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 


Paid to 






Angus I Savory 




$ 10 50 


B J Conley 




25 17 


M E Kneeland 




2 18 


M C McGinley, M D 


A 


230 40 


C E Ames, M D 


BURIALS. 


223 00 


Paid to 






E J M Scahill 




$10 00 




INSTITUTIONS. 




Paid to 






Cable Hospital 


LR CITIES AND TO\ 


$274 40 


OTHI 


VNS. 


Paid to 






City of Gloucester 




$48 30 


City of Lynn 




58 60 


City of Beverly 


MOTHERS' AID. 


167 84 


Paid to . 






Sundry Persons, local 


cases 


$412 00 


Town of Rowley 




• 6 00 


Town of Danvers 




72 00 


Town of West Newbury 


260 00 



$491 25 



$10 00 



$274 40 



$274 74 



$750 00 



42 IPSWKH TOWN REPORT 



OTHER EXPENSES. 

Paid to 

Hiller & Co., supplies 
H E Burnham. car fares 
J W MacDonald, car fares 


$6 70 
7 00 
4 00 


$17 70 




$7700 00 
6 40 


Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 


$5567 62 

2138 78 


Appropriation 

Appropriation unpaid 1918 bills 


$7706 40 
$7706 40 



*From the above balance of $2138 78 the following 
amounts have been transferred by vote of the Selectmen : 
To Highway Department $1034 49 

To Town Hall Department 205 12 

$1239 61 

Receipts to the credit of this department for the year 
have been as follows : 

Conim. of Massachusetts, Temp. Aid $ 8 00 

Comm. of Mass., Sup of Sick Pauper 5 00 

Reimbursement from Individuals 117 75 

$130 75 

Accounts due and unpaid : 
Comm. of Mass.. Mothers' Aid Cases $364 00 

Total credits 

Total expenditures for 1919 

Xet expense for 1919 



$494 75 


5567 62 


5072 87 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 43 

During the year the following old accounts have been 
paid: 

Comm. of Mass., Temporary Aid $424 56 

Comm. of Mass., Mothers' Aid Cases 286 00 

$710 56 



44 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Town Farm Department* 

SALARIES AND WAGES. 

Paid to 

Edgar I Holland, Superintendent $600 00 

Margaret A Holland, Matron 180 00 

Hazel G Grant 60 00 

Lawrence Adams 12 00 

(lias R Davis 2 00 

Thomas Boylan 355 00 

Alice Bovlan 180 00 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Paid to 

('has Canelos $ 13 25 

Tougas & Tougas 179 13 

Walter F Poole 88 43 

W E Scott 84 88 

Marcorelle Bros. 114 44 

Grand Union Tea Co. 15 85 

W S Atkinson , 6 10 

Co-op. Grocery Stores Co. 408 82 

Ipswich Meat Market s 72 47 



$1389 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



45 



Paid to 
( i C Bayley 
W G Claxton 
John T Connor Co. 
Titcomb & Co. 
J G Paganis 



DRY GOODS AND CLOTHING. 

Paid to 

Hiller & Co. $64 89 

Newman's Dept. Store 61 44 

Louis H Bixby 9 00 

Chas G Spiller 9 60 



13 


00 


23 


21 


16 


37 


3 


78 


2 


30 





FUEL AND LIGHT. 




Paid to 






George Fall 




$35 10 


Standard Oil Co. 




29 50 


Chas L Lovell 




18 34 


A H Peatfield 




17 22 


Lathrop Bros. 




18 24 



EQUIPMENT AND REPAIRS. 

Paid to 
C F Chapman & Son, supplies $11 85 

Mayer & Porter, supplies 9 36 

Geo W Hills, painting 9 25 

John W Goodhue, hardware and supplies 87 15 

Racket Bargain Store, supplies 19 13 

A J Brennan, plumbing 29 49 

Arthur C Damon, supplies 58 65 

Austin L Lord, masonry 14 70 



$1042 03 



$144 93 



$118 40 



46 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

Paid to 
Joseph A King, repairs 
The Chas Williams Stores, engine 
Stephen Jewett, hay binder 
E Wilson, repairs and supplies 
W J Norwood, filing saws 
Angus I Savory, supplies 
Chas R Davis, harness 
Edw E Wells, barrel 
C F Miller, supplies 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
John G Sperling, carpentry 
Chas G Hull, carpentry 

GRAIN. 



28 


25 


95 


85 


3 


00 


93 


28 


1 


50 


15 


40 


8 


00 


3 


00 


8 


00 


72 


38 


105 


00 


80 00 



$753 24 



Paid to 






Wm G Horton 


$287 25 




Geo B Brown 


110 80 


$398 05 


OTHER EXPENSES. 




Paid to 






Angus I Savory, supplies 


$23 15 




Wm McCarthy, shoeing 


41 20 




A P Littlefield, shoeing 


14 50 




Chas Henley, labor 


25 00 




Brown Drug Co., supplies 


12 49 




G A Barker, insurance 


26 40 




S H Thurston, supplies 


3 15 


$145 89 







Total expenditures $3991 54 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 47 

Unexpended balance 333 46 

$4325 00 
Balance from 1918 $ 325 00 

Appropriation 4000 00 

$4325 00 



48 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



INVENTORY, STOCK, 


TOOLS, ETC., 


AT TOWN FARM. 




Jan 


. 1, 1920 


Jan 


. 1, 1919 






No. 


Value 


No. 


Value 


Cain Loti 


Beef Cow 


1 


$ 60 


00 


1 


$ 50 


00 


$ 10 00 


Cows 


9 


1000 


00 


10 


1000 


00 




Bull 


1 


' 75 


00 


1 


75 


00 




Heifers 


9 


350 


00 


5 


200 


00 


150 00 


Horses 


3 


750 


00 


3 


750 


00 




Pigs and Shoats 


5 


80 


00 


4 


52 


00 


28 00 


Fowl 


60 


75 


00 


50 


55 


00 


20 00 


Geese 


2 


8 


00 








8 00 


Carts and Wagons 


8 


475 


00 


8 


475 


00 




Mowing Machine 


1 


45 


00 


1 


45 


00 




Plows 


2 


25 


00 


2 


25 


00 




Cultivators 


2 


20 


00 


2 


20 


00 




Horse Hoe 


1 


5 


00 


1 


5 


00 




Horse Hay Fork 


1 


50 


00 


1 


50 


00 




Harrows 


4 


50 


00 


4 


50 


00 




Sleds 


1 


15 


00 


1 


15 


00 




Drags 


1 


6 


00 


1 


6 


00 




Wood, cords 


9 


108 


00 


4 


40 


00 


68 00 


Coal, tons 


3 


36 


75 


4 


48 


00 


$ 11 25 


Groceries and Provisions 




160 


00 




125 


00 


35 00 


Dairy Utensils 




15 


00 




15 


00 




Furniture and Bedding 




500 


00 




500 


00 




Range and Fixtures 




110 


00 




110 


00 




Stoves and Furnaces 




150 


00 




150 


00 




Tedder 


1 


15 


00 


1 


15 


00 




Tools 




20 


00 




10 


00 


10 00 


Blocks and Ropes 




5 


00 




5 


00 




Ice Chests 


1 


36 


00 


1 


36 


00 




Harness and Blankets 




100 


00 




100 


00 




Potato Digger 


1 


1 


00 


1 


1 


00 




Wheelbarrows 


2 


10 


00 


2 


10 


00 




Lumber 




5 


00 








5 00 


Double Bob 


1 


20 


00 


1 


20 


00 




Seed Sowers 


2 


10 


00 


2 


10 


00 




Wood Saw 


1 


100 


00 


1 


50 


00 


50 00 


Hogs 


3 


150 


00 


2 


150 


00 




Hay Rake 


1 


21 


00 


1 


21 


00 




Pump Jack 


1 


14 


00 


1 


14 


00 




Auto Truck 








1 


150 


00 


150 00 


Oil Tanks 


2 


15 


00 


2 


15 


00 





Total $4690 75 $4468 00 $384 00 $161 25 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 4!' 



IXVENTORY- 


-PRODUCE, ETC., AT TOWN FARM 






Jan 


. 1, 1920 Jan. 1, 1919 










No. 


Value No. Value 


Cain 


Loss 


Corn, bushels on cob 


175 


$175 00 150 $150 00 


$ 25 


00 




Onions, bushels 


6 


13 50 9 12 00 


1 


50 




Beans, bushels 


4 


32 00 4 32 00 








Potatoes, bushels 


30 


50 00 64 100 00 






$ 50 00 


Roots, bushels 


200 


150 00 185 150 00 








English Hay, tons 


45 


1350 00 35 1000 00 


350 


00 




Salt Hay, tons 


5 


50 00 5 50 00 








Mulch, tons 


10 


50 00 10 50 00 








Squash 




20 00 30 00 






10 00 


Vinegar 




60 00 30 00 


30 


00 




Salt Pork, lbs. 


175 


44 00 125 42 50 


1 


50 




Grain 




9 00 25 00 






16 00 


Total 




$2003 50 $1671 50 $408 


00 


$ 76 00 


Inv'ry, Stock & Tools 




4690 75 4468 00 


384 00 
$792 00 


161 25 






$6694 25 $6139 50 


$237 25 






6139 50 


237 


25 





Net Gain » $554 75 $554 75 



Summary of Income and Expenditures at the Town Farm for the 
Years 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919. 





1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


Expended 
Income 


$3640 06 
1137 59 


$3823 47 
872 05 


$4203 68 
1677 06 


$3693 80 
1520 11 


$3991 54 
1879 60 


Net Expense 


$2502 47 


$2951 42 


$2526 62 


$2173 69 


$2111 94 



Number of inmates at Farm January 1, 1920 9 

Average number of inmates at Farm during the year 10 

Total number of inmates registered in 1919 16 

Average cost per week for each inmate $4 06 

Sales for year 1919 (produce) $1674 60 

Sale of auto $190 00 

Land rent $15 W 

Amount collected on old accounts k 52 95 



50 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Soldiers' Benefits* 



STATE AID. 

Paid to 

Sundry Persons, cash $1886 00 



Total expenditures $1886 00 

Unexpended balance 614 00 



$2500 00 
Appropriation $2500 00 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 






Paid to 






Sundry Persons, cash 


$741 64 




Lathrop Bros., fuel 


45 48 




Wm O Conant, fuel 


31 00 




Mrs M Marcaurelle, groceries 


144 02 




Tougas & Tougas, groceries 


66 06 




F R Starkey, groceries 


26 57 




John A. Brown, rent 


84 00 




Geo E MacArthur, M D, med attendance 


6 00 




Geo G Bailey, M D, med attendance 


62 00 




Total expenditures 




$1206 77 


Unexpended balance 




293 23 




$1500 00 


Appropriation 




$1500 00 



IPSWICTI TOWN REPORT 51 



Recreation* 





PARKS. 






Paid to 








Alvery Marriott, labor 




$14 00 




Chas H Wells, labor 




146 40 




Frank T Goodhue, labor 




80 70 




Fred Buzzell, labor 




7 35 




Samuel C Gordon, plants and fertilizer 


99 80 




Wm G Horton, fertilizer 




2 75 




Water Dept., water 




12 00 




Wm P Reilly, supplies 




3 82 




John W Goodhue, supplies 


i 


3 19 


- 


American Railway Ex Co., 


express 


71 




Total expenditures 




$370 72 


Unexpended balance 




» 


4 28 




$375 00 


Appropriation 






$375 00 



INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION. 
Paid to 

J H Lakeman, P M, thrift stamps $24 00 
Earl Ewing, labor 2 00 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 7 00 

John W Goodhue, supplies 1 10 

Ipswich Mills Concert Band, music 147 00 

King Arthur Commandery Band, music 70 00 



52 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

Paid to 
Sundry Persons, cash pries 41 36 



Total expenditures $292 46 

Unexpended balance 7 54 

$300 00 
Appropriation $300 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 53 



Cemeteries* 

Paid to 

Edward N Martel, labor $364 40 

A G Lauer, labor 1 00 

L A Lord, labor 313 25 

Howard Blake, labor 420 14 

Howard J Blake, labor 220 11 

P E Clarke, labor 52 00 

Wm M Davey, labor 33 80 

Edward C Brooks, labor - 121 20 

O M Hills, labor 41 90 

E J M Scahill, labor 45 00 

Geo H Burbidge, labor 80 80 

Harry Dort, labor 19 20 

W F Rutherford, labor 28 40 

Harry Miller, labor 9 60 

W B Richards, labor . 25 60 

John Hovey, labor 19 20 

Star Princewood, labor 38 40 

Dalbert E Kent, labor 22 40 

Chas E Kent, labor 9 60 

J H Hull, Jr., labor 25 60 

Rees Jenkins, teaming 104 60 



54 IPSWICH TOWX REPORT 



Paid to 








Samuel C Gordon, plant 




75 40 




Geo H Lord, plants 




34 02 




Angus I Savory, supplies 




4 53 




John W Goodhue, supplies 




5 58 




Water Dept., water 




30 25 




R L Purinton, plumbing 




L3 07 




Total expenditures 




$2159 05 


Unexpended balance 






21 95 


V 


$2181 00 


Appropriation 




$1845 00 




Transfer from Reserve Fund 




336 00 










$2181 00 


PERPETUAL CARE 




Paid to 








Howard Blake, labor 




$146 05 




L A Lord, labor 




172 50 




Edward Bodwell, labor 




35 00 




M Hills, labor 




5 00 




A J Barton & Son, labor 




1 50 




Carrie R Brown, flowe' 




3 00 




Total expenditures 




$363 05 


Cemetery Trust Funds, Perpetu 


al Care 




$363 05 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 55 



Unclassified* 

MEMORIAL DAY. 

Paid to 
Gen James Appleton Post 128, GAR $250 00 



Total expenditures 
Appropriation 

1 SHELL FISH. 

Paid to 
Henry A Churchill, salary 
Farley C Lord, salary 
E Warren Dodge, salary 

Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Balance from 1918 
Appropriation 



WELCOME HOME CELEBRATION. 

J H Lakeman, P M, postage $ 5 94 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing 191 50 

R L Purinton, plumbing 57 36 







$250 00 






$250 00 


$66 


67 




66 


66 




66 


66 . 








$200 00 




— 


20 00 




$220 00 


$ 20 


00 




200 00 


*99n on 



56 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 
Robert Miller & Co., banner 
Arthur W Gould, carpentry 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
S D Dodge, auto hire 
Ipswich News Co., cigars 
W E Scott, cigars 
Herbert Whitaker, entertainment 
R W Davis, auto hire 



35 00 

3 00 

4 71 
8 00 

56 00 

45 00 

98 64 

2 00 



New England Decorating Co., decorations 690 00 

Harding Uniform & Regalia Co., badges 5 00 

John W Goodhue, flags and supplies 90 16 

C S Tyler, flags 2 50 

Manzer & Damon, carpentry 96 48 

Geo W Hills, painting 38 54 

Chas G Hull, printing 13 00 

Andrew Schelehuber Co., Inc., caterer 2184 75 

Alonzo L Brown, labor 5 00 

Harry Rutherford, labor 8 60 

Ipswich Mills Concert Band, music 188 25 

King Arthur Commandery Band, music 70 00 

Salem Cadet Band, music 171 50 

H A Russell, meals for band 14 55 

Chas A Glover, orchestra 142 30 

American Ex Co., express 33 

F E Wood, trucking 8 50 

Whitehead & Hoag Co., medals 351 32 

Wm J Riley, cash paid out 2 00 

Myrtle H Cunningham, cash paid out 2 20 

White Enter Bureau, entertainment 100 80 

B J Conley, supplies 3 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 
Chas S Garrette, flowers and catering 427 85 



$5123 78 



, HONOR ROLL EXPENSES. 

Paid to 
Manzer & Damon, carpentry 
Elmer C Smith, painting 
C IT Buck & Co., painting 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

Sale of tickets and cigars 



$262 35 




14 70 




177 23 






$454 28 






$5578 06 




188 04 




$5766 10 


$5000 00 




766 10 






$5766 10 



PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE. 

Paid to 

Ipswich Chronicle, printing $55 65 

H A Russell, meals 3 04 

Ipswich Mills Concert Band, music 30 00 

C C Birchard & Co., supplies 12 40 

F E Wood, trucking 8 00 

L A Clark, costumes 15 59 

H N Doughty, cash paid out 5 50 

G A Barker, cash paid out 2 '00 

Chas S Garrette, supplies 3 50 

Ipswich Mills, supplies 8 94 

John W Goodhue, supplies 18 29 



58 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Paid to 
J E Greene, carpentry 4 35 



Total expenditures $167 26 

Unexpended balance 12 74 



$180 00 
Transfer from Reserve Fund $180 00 



ELECTRIC LIGHT COMMITTEE. 

Paid to 
M Charles Arthur, cash paid out 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
J J Merrill, survey 
Dorothy L Gerry, clerical work 
Electric Light Dept., services 



Total expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 



$10 35 




28'00 




100 00 




5 00 




27 18 






$170 53 




29 47 




$200 00 




$200 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 59 



Reserve Fund* 

Transferred to 

Law Department $ 406 67 

Public Safety Committee 180 00 

Police Department 1800 00 

Weights & Measures Department 46 25 

Cemetery Department 336 00 

Town Hall Department 231 08 



Total amount transferred $3000 00 

Appropriation $3000 00 



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62 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Perpetual Care— Cemetery Funds* 



Name of Fund 
Cogswell 

Andrews 


Amount 

Jan. 1919 
$417 17 
279 09 


Balance 
Income Expense Jan. 1920 
$16 68 50 $431 35 
11 16 4 00 286 25 


Giddings 


166 


28 


6 


65 


9 


00 


163 


93 


Potter 


127 


41 


5 


09 


3 


00 


129 


50 


Kinsman 


7: > 


95 


2 


95 


1 


50 


75 


40 


Samuel Blood 


66 


10 


2 


64 


4 


00 


64 


74 


Stamford 


125 


23 


5 


00 


1 


50 


128 


73 


Trow 


432 


09 


L7 


28 


3 


00 


446 


37 


Dawson 


155 


57 


6 


22 


2 


00 


159 


79 


Birch 


53 


76 


2 


15 


2 


00 


53 


91 


Aaron Kinsman 


57 


54 


2 


30 


9 


00 


57 


84 


Varrell 




4.") 


15 


41 


6 


00 


394 


86 


Eben Kimball 


190 


00 


7 


60 


2 


00 


195 


60 


Willcomb 


80 


93 


3 23 


3 


50 


80 


66 


Daniel Clarke 


138 


65 


5 


54 


2 


00 


142 


19 


Rogers & Johnson 


108 


98 


4 


36 


l 


00 


109 


34 


Harriet L Kimball 


149 


12 


5 


96 


4 


00 


151 


08 


George Kinsman 


150 


08 


6 


00 


4 


00 


152 


08 


Martha Lakeman 


71 


86 


2 


87 


1 


50 


73 


23 


Caldwell 


125 


54 


5 


02 


2 


00 


128 


56 


Pingree 


104 


16 


4 


16 


2 


00 


106 


32 


Young 


25 


48 


1 


02 


1 


00 


25 


50 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 63 





Amount 








Bala, 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 


1919 


Income 


Expense 


Jan. 1920 


Coburn 


328 


21 


L3 


12 


5 00 


336 


Mary Haskell 


56 


60 


■J 


26 


2 00 


56 86 


Hovey 


L35 


20 


5 


40 


5 00 


L35 60 


Plouff 


58 


82 


2 


35 


2 00 


59 17 


Farley 


150 


69 


6 


02 


2 00 


154 71 


John B Lam. on 


71 


97 


2 


87 


1 50 


73 34 


Joseph Spiller 


58 


26 


•2 


33 


2 00 


58 59 


Locust Grove 


40 


91 


1 


64 




42 55 


Mary E Peatfield 


118 


98 


4 


76 


2 00 


121 74 


Lucy F Spiller 


63 


43 


2 


53 


2 00 


63 96 


Josiah & Lydia H Lord 


153 


78 


6 


15 




159 93 


Eben Caldwell 


119 


76 


4 


79 


3 00 


121 55 


M E Barber 


61 


56 


2 


46 




64 02 


Sarah E Durgin 


106 


48 


4 


25 


2 00 


108 73 


Joanna Kinsman 


127 


01 


5 


08 


2 50 


129 59 


Charles W Giddings 


' 123 28 


4 


93 




128 21 


John Allen Brown 


128 


63 


5 


14 


3 00 


130 77 


Millett & Kimball 


225 


91 


9 


03 


7 00 


227 94 


Samuel Blake 


134 


25 


5 


37 


2 00 


137 62 


William G Brown 


143 


51 


5 


74 




149 25 


Catherine Clarke 


141 


48 


5 


66 


2 00 


145 14 


Charles Palmer 


115 


83 


4 


63 


4 00 


116 46 


Sally Roberts 


152 


18 


6 


08 


4 00 


154 26 


Eugene Spinney 


139 


80 


5 


59 


2 00 


143 39 


Mary M Fields 


68 


85 


2 


75 


1 50 


70 10 


Luther Lord 


131 


05 


5 


24 


4 00 


132 29 


Ezra Lord 


139 


02 


5 


56 


2 00 


142 58 


Lucy H Brown 


138 


03 


5 


52 


2 00 


141 55 


Patience C Bray 


120 


09 


4 


80 


3 00 


121 89 


Richard T Dodge 


136 


67 


5 


46 


2 00 


140 13 



64 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 





Amount 








Balance 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 


1919 


Incomq Expense 


Jan. 1920 


Henry F Russell 


109 


36 


4 37 


2 50 


111 23 


George Haskell 


331 


66 


13 


26 




344 92 


Theodore C Howe 


135 


08 


5 


40 


2 00 


138 48 


Nathaniel Shatswell 


132 


45 


5 


29 


4 00 


133 74 


George H Gilmore 


68 


48 


. 2 


74 


1 50 


69 72 


Wm A & Ida M Staekpole 


167 


83 


6 


71 


5 00 


169 54 


Hannah H Pearson 


62 


52 


2 


50 


1 50 


63 52 


Harry K Dodge 


132 


84 


4 


31 


2 00 


136 15 


Henry S Holmes 


112 


71 


4 50 


4 00 


113 21 


Caroline E Hodgkins 


56 


59 


2 


26 


2 00 


56 85 


Aaron F Brown 


71 


37 


2 


85 




74 22 


J Farley Kinsman 


123 


89 


4 


95 


2 00 


126 84 


Thomas Brown 


114 


72 


4 


58 


2 00 


117 30 


Wm P & Arthur W Gould 13] 


:>4 


5 


26 


2 00 


134 80 


Lucy C Coburn 


272 


59 


10 


90 




283 49 


William H Kinsman 


119 


62 


4 78 


2 50 


121 90 


Caroline E Bonier 


L16 


59 


4 


66 


5 00 


116 25 


Elizabeth A Bailey 


60 21 


2 


40 


1 50 


61 11 


John Lane 


54 


10 


2 


16 


2 00 


54 26 


Hannah Parsons 


65 


60 


2 


62 


3 00 


65 22 


E & T F Cogswell 


100 


25 


4 


00 


3 00 


101 25 


Moses & Ezekiel Peabody 


112 


23 


4 


48 


2 00 


114 71 


Charles H Cutler 


127 


86 


5 


11 


2 00 


130 97 


Wm & Abagail Haskell 


54 


90 


2 


19 


2 00 


55 09 


Willis & Stacy 


125 


53 


5 


02 


3 50 


127 05 


George E Lord 


123 


77 


4 


95 


2 00 


126 72 


Nora Fraser 


56 


50 


2 


26 


2 00 


56 76 


Franklin G Morris • 


126 


60 


5 


06 


2 00 


129 66 


Robert Stone 


52 


53 


2 


10 


2 00 


52 63 


Emerson Howe 


119 


36 


4 


37 


5 00 


118 73 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 65 



Name of Fund 

Caroline E Lord 
Robert Gilmore 
John D Cilley 
James Griffin 
Eunice Caldwell Cowles 
Ward F Kenney 
Josiah Dudley 
John C Kimball 
Jennet F Caldwell 
Rebecca G Hayes 
John Galbraith 
Thomas Holland 
John Choate 
Lucy Slade Lord 
Walter E Lord 
Lemuel Smith 
Samuel el Goodhue 
John A Johnson 
Charles H Noyes 
Edwin H Damon 
Benjamin Newman 
Nathaniel Archer 
Abby J Purington 
Sarah A Sewarcl 
Frances P Weeks 
George A Lord 
William Heard 
Martha E Hanson 
Charlotte M Kimball 
Mary J Patterson 



Amount 










Balance 


Jan. 1919 


Income 


Exp 


ense 


Jan. 1920 


100 05 


4 


00 


4 05 


100 00 


250 06 


10 00 


2 


00 


258 06 


125 15 


5 


00 


2 


00 


128 15 


122 37 


4 89 


2 


00 


125 26 


130 35 


5 


21 






135 56 


57 14 


2 


28 


1 


50 


57 92 


108 36 


4 


33 


2 


00 


110 69 


370 57 


14 82 


5 


00 


380 39 


200 81 


8 


03 




r 


208 84 


53 40 


2 


13 


1 


50 


54 03 


106 58 


4 


26 


6 


00 


104 84 


119 58 


4 


78 


2 


00 


122 36 


77 86 


3 


11 


2 


00 


78 97 


130 02 


5 


20 






135 22 


114 21 


4 


56 


2 


00 


116 77 


52 92 


2 


12 


2 


00 


53 04 


56 33 


2 


25 


1 


50 


57 08 


117 25 


4 


69 


2 


00 


119 94 


55 77 


2 


23 


1 


50 


56 50 


55 77 


2 


33 


1 


50 


56 60 


117 11 


4 


68 


2 


00 


119 79 


113 43 


4 53 


3 


50 


114 46 


116 54 


4 


66 


2 


00 


119 20 


115 13 


4 


60 


2 


00 


117 73 


56 24 


2 


24 


1 


50 


56 98 


53 91 


2 


15 






56 06 


108 86 


4 35 


2 


00 


111 21 


231 53 


9 


26 


5 


00 


235 79 


116 22 


4 


64 






120 86 


110 70 


4 43 


4 


00 


111 13 



66 IPSWICH TOAYX REPORT 



Xame of Fund 
William L Rust 
E Maria Stone 
L S & E B Jewett 
John Cook 
Jonathan L Choate 
Sarah E Twombly 
N S & Eben Kimball 
General James Applet on 
Etta L Wentworth 
Baker & Dixon 
Charles H Baker 
Jeremiah Brocklebank 
William H Russell 
Winthrop Low 
Edward Morrill 
Richard L Spiller 
Abbie M Fellows 
Nathaniel R Farley 
Eunice & Elizabeth Far lev 
Mrs Chas S Willcomb 
Elizabeth L Chapman 
Clara B Dobson 
Airs Chas D Weeks 
Mary E Roberts 
Everard H Martin 
John B Brown 
Airs Harriet A Lamson 
William Kimball 
Olive P Smith 
David F Dow 



Amount 










Balance 


.Jan. 1919 


Income 


Exp 


ense 


Jan. 1920 


51 64 


2 


06 


1 


50 


52 20 


83 00 


3 


32 


4 


00 


82 


268 72 


10 


74 


6 


00 


273 46 


52 66 


2 


10 


1 


50 


53 26 


162 72 


6 


50 


3 


00 


166 22 


105 37 


4 


21 


3 


00 


106 58 


104 41 


4 


17 




00 


104 58 


258 97 


10 


35 


5 


00 


264 32 


51 64 


2 


06 


2 


00 


51 70 


44 39 


1 


77 


2 


00 


44 16 


78 66 


3 


14 


2 


00 


79 80 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


51 56 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


5] 56 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


51 56 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


51 56 


102 04 


4 


08 


3 


00 


103 12 


51 54 


2 


06 


1 


50 


52 10 


104 08 


4 


16 


2 


00 


106 24 


r 51 04 


2 


04 


1 


00 


52 08 


104 08 


4 


16 


2 00 


106 24 


152 04 


6 


08 






158 12 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


51 56 


106 12 


3 


74 






109 86 


104 32 


4 


17 


3 


50 


104 99 


101 50 


4 


06 


3 


00 


102 56 


107 12 


4 


28 


2 


00 


109 40 


51 02 


2 


04 


1 


50 


51 56 


76 20 


3 


04 


2 


00 


77 24 


102 00 


4 08 


3 


00 


103 08 


50 00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


50 00 



IPSAY It'll TOWN IMPORT 67 





Amount 








Balance 


Name of Fund 


Jan. 1919 


ome 


Expense 


Jan. i: 


Eliza A Foss 


51 50 


2 


06 






Sylvanus Caldwell 


LT)3 00 


4 


12 


4 on 


103 12 


Mary J Staniford 


103 50 


4 


14 


2 00 


105 


Frank H Lord 


102 00 


4 08 


6 00 


100 08 


Mary E Bowen 


51 00 




04 


2 00 


51 04 


Peatfield 


101 00 


4 04 


2 00 


103 04 


H B Brown 


75 75 


3 


03 


1 50 


77 28 


George A Mann 


101 00 


4 


04 


2 00 


103 04 


Alice H Bone 


50 50 


2 


02 


1 50 


51 02 


John H Baker 


50 00 


2 


oo l 


1 50 


50 50 


E K & Margaretta Brown 100 00 


4 


00 


2 00 


102 00 


Pauline T Farley 


100 00 


3 


66 




103 66 


William DuckAvorth 


150 00 


4 


00 


2 00 


152 00 


George Spiller 


300 00 


8 


00 




308 00 


Foster Russell 


100 00 


2 


33 




102 33 


Emma AY Tyler 


100 00 


2 


00 




102 00 


Emma Baxter 


50 00 


1 


00 




51 00 


Wm A Spiller 


50 00 


1 


00 




51 00 


Seth Senior 


50 00 




83 




50 83 


E M Carpenter 


50 00 




50 




50 50 


John C Foss 


50 00 




33 




50 33 


Joseph Johnson 


50 00 








50 00 


Dexter Mclntire 


50 00 








50 00 


Mary A Foster 


50 00 








50 00 




$18977 81 $735 43 $363 05 $19350 19 


Income undivided 










66 



$19350 85 



68 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount of Fund, January, 1919 $17812 39 

New Funds during year $1175 00 

Income from Investments 726 51 

$1901 51 



$19713 90 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for care of lots $363 05 



% 








$19350 85 


INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 




Town of Ipswich, Electric Light 4s 


$2000 00 




Town of Ipswich, Water 


7500 00 




City of Fitchburg School 4s 


3000 00 




Water Front Improvement Loan 4s 


2100 00 




Liberty Bonds 


3600 00 




Ipswich Savings Bank 


1082 85 




Cash on hand 


68 00 


$19350 85 






INCOME ACCOUNT 


i 




Balance undivided January, 1919 




$9 58 


Town of Ipswich, Electric Light Loan 


$ 80 00 




Town of Ipswich, Water 


300 00 




City of Fitchburg, School Loan 


120 00 




Water Front Improvement 


84 00 




Liberty Bonds 


132 59 




Ipswich Savings Bank 


9 92 


$726 51 







$736 09 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 69 



CREDIT. 

Cemetery Funds ■ $735 43 

Income undivided 66 



$736 09 



OTHER TRUST FUNDS. 



ELIZABETH M. BROWN FUND. 
Town of Ipswich, in trust, the income to be used under 
the direction of the Selectmen, by the Agent of the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 
Balance, January, 1919 $878 92 

Income 17 56 



Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, Jan. 1920 $896 48 



JOHN C. KIMBALL FUND. 
Town of Ipswich, Trustee, under the will of John C. 
Kimball, income to be used for the purchase of books for 
the Ipswich Public Library. 

Balance, January, 1919 $522 46 

Income 10 00 

$532 46 

Feb. 28, 1919, paid to F. A. Kimball, Treasurer 22 46 



Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank, January, 1919 $510 00 



70 IPSWICH To WW REPORT 



Treasurer's Department* 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 




RECEIPTS 








Balance, January. 1919 




$25205 


70 


Taxes, 1914 $ 5 


60 




1915 


57 


89 




1916 


645 


10 




1917 


4968 


71 




1918 


15300 


30 




1919 


98316 


22 




Moth, 1916 


1 


80 




1917 


27 


55 




1918 


150 


73 




1919 


1399 


43 




Department Bills : 








City of Cambridge, Soldiers' Relief 








a/c 


231 


00 




Coram, of Mass., Poor a/c, 1918 


424 


56 




" " " Mothers' Aid 








a/c, 1918 


286 


00 




" " " Sick support 


5 


00 




Temporary Aid 


8 


00 




" State Aid, 1918 


2684 


00 




" " " Contagious Diseas 


50 




Miscellaneous Dept. bills 


109 


94 




Revenue Receipts: 








Comm. of Mass., Income Tax, 1917 


468 


00 




n it n u k i92g 


819 


00 




ii it n a a i9i9 


10962 


96 




" " " " 1919 








School Fund 


4460 


00 





IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 71 

Comm, of Ma^s. Streel Railway Tax 738 96 

Corporation Tax, 

Pub. Service 1942 27 
( Jorporatiofl Tax, 

Business 6731 28 

National Bank Tax 9048 

Nat. Bank Tax, 1917 5892 

Soldiers' Exemption 86 

Liquor Li 1620 00 

Junk Licenses 120 00 

Motor Vehicle Licen 20 00 

Other Lie Pee and I Vim 189 00 

Third Dis I Jourt, Criminal Fin< - 656 30 

Count v of Bs ex, Dog Licens 329 38 

Collector's Dept., Cost -, etc. 116 39 

Other General Government Receipts 256 15 

rich Mills. Police Service 600 00 

Fire Dept., Receipts 31 88 

Tree Warden, Receipt-"; 45 00 

Comm. of Mass., Tuberculosis Subsidy 6 43 

Mass. Highway Commission, Turnpike 

reimbursement 25 55 

\ Jounty of Essex, Turnpike reim- 
bursement 1500 00 
Bay State St. Ry. Co., Excise Tax, 

1917 and 1918 
Comm. of Mass., Bounty on Seal 
Town Farm Receipts 
Rent of Town Hall 
Poor Dept., Receipts 
Comm. of Mass., Tuition * of State 

Wards 
Town of Rowley, Tuition 
Miscellaneous Receipts, School Dept. 
Sale of Hay at Playground 
Interest on Taxes 



3387 


38 


2 


00 


1879 


60 


294 


00 


117 


75 


266 


00 


1072 


50 


32 


28 


15 


00 


1456 


68 



72 



IPSWICH TOWN' REPORT 



Interest on Deposits 

Town Scale Receipt > 

Sale of Cemetery Lots and Graves 

Town Farm Insurance Refund 

All other revenue receipts 

County of Essex, Essex Road reim 

bursement 
Mass. Highway Commission, Es ex 

Road reimbursement 
Electric. Light Dept., light, power, etc 
Water Dept., water s, supplies, etc. 
Temporary Loa 
Electric Light Loan 
Highway Dept., Loan 
Sundry Persons, Perpetual Care Funds 
Cemetery Trust Funds care of Lots 
Income from Trust Funds 
Welcome Home Committee, sale of 

banquet tickets, etc. 



905 


77 




20 


30 




450 


00 




2 


20 




310 


46 






*5h\S77 


74 




• p ' / \ 1 CJ 1 1 


i i 


1200 


00 




1200 


00 




. 28039 


57 




. 1515:5 






85000 


00 




6000 


00 




2500 


00 




Is 1175 


00 




363 


05 




776 


53 




766 


10 






$323788 


24 



$348993 94 



IPSWICH TOWN 


REPORT 


73 


EXPENDITURES 






Accountant's Warrants : 








Department Orders 


$l: 


Electric Light Dept. Payments 




.J7727 


44 


Electric Light Notes 




3550 


00 


Electric Light Interest 




2284 


00 


Water Dept. Payments 




12653 


08 


Water Dept. Interest 




7917 


00 


Water Dept. Notes 




2150 


00 


Temporary Loans 




90000 


00 


Interest on Temporary Loans 




2148 


67 


General Loans 




6500 


00 


Interest on General Loans 




1995 


50 


State Tax 




14410 


00 


State Highway Tax 




4760 


50 


Special State Tax 




864 


60 


County Tax 




10635 


42 


Non-Resident Bank Tax 




457 


11 


Comm. of Mass., Liquor License Fees 


397 


50 


Wm, J. Riley, Treas. Trust Funds 








Perpetual Care Accounts 




1175 


00 


Trust Fund Income 




771. 


53 


Bay State St. Ry. Co., Refund-Over 






payment Excise Tax 




144 


17 


Mass. Highway Comm., Turnpike 


re- 






imbursement 




1500 


00 


Bounty on Seal 




2 


00 4 






«pOOt I ± 1 o.' 


Balance, Dec. 31, 1919 






14276 05 



$348993 94 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



BALANCE SHEET. 


DR. 




Cash on hand, December 31, 1 


t276 05 


Win. J. Riley, Collector, Tax 1913 $ 


97 33 


" 1914 


863 36 


" 1915 


16 64 


" 1916 


29 05 


HUT 


16 34 


" 1918 


5587 21 


• 1919 


17676 37 


Moth 1908 W 


38 71 


" 1911 


2 26 


" 1912 


8 38 


" 1913 


54 95 


" 1914 


8 84 


11 1915 


21 85 


" 1916 


127 47 


" 1917 


58 85 


" 1918 


68 


" 1919 


258 62 


Street Sprinkling, 1911 
1912 


03 

10 09 


1913 


14 82 


Electric Light 
Water 


4304 38 
5223 01 


Department Bills 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 


1054 85 

1882 67 


Revenue, 1920 


2381 98 


Overlay, 1915 


387 81 


Water Department 658 21 

$41672 93 
Sinking Fund, Ipswich Water Dept. $122025 20 
Net Bonded Debt 178724 80 




^007n0 00 


Trust Funds 


$20757 33 




$377456 31 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT 



75 



BALANCE SHEET. 



CR. 






Overlay, 1912 


$ 283 


4:! 


1913 


100 


19 


1914 


117 


66 


1917 


290 


68 


1918 


408 


78 


1919 


1898 


Q6 


In urance, Fire Loss 


2104 


80 


Temporary Loans 


25000 


00 


Electric Light Revenue 


4304 


38 


Water Revenue 


522:] 


01 


Moth Suppression 


2287 


24 


Eagle Hill Road 


82 


24 


Essex Road 


593 


10 


Blaisdell Avenue 


89 


01 


Town Farm 


325 


00 


Education 


816 


74 


Shell Fish 


20 


00 


Welcome Home Celebration 


188 


04 


Electric Light Department 


1383 


13 






ipTtOOXU ^.O 


Refunding Loan 


$5600 ( 


Central Fire Station Loan 


8000 


oc 


Electric Light Loan 


59950 


00 


Water Loan 


195900 


00 


Winthrop School Loan 


17000 00 


Heating Plan Loan 


6000 


00 


Water Front Improvement Loan 


2100 


00 


State Guard Equipment Loan 


3700 


00 


Eighway Department Loan 


2500 


00 

$300750 00 



Cemetery Trust Funds 
Ki in ball Library Fund 
Brown Animal Fund 



Excess and Deficiency 



$19350 85 
510 00 

896 48 



$20757 33 

$367022 82 
$ 10433 49 

$377456 31 



76 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 

I certify that I have examined the accounts of the 
Treasurer and find them correct, and find the balance in the 
hands of the treasurer to agree with the report submitted. 

I have approved vouchers for all bills paid and find 
them to agree with the Treasurer's warrants. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 



XOTES MATURING 1920. 




Centra] Fire Station Loan . 


$ 1000 00 


Refunding Loan 


700 


00 


Winthrop School Loan 


2000 


00 


Heating- Plant Loan 


o00 


00 


Water Front Improvement Loan 


300 


00 


State Guard Equipment Loan 


1000 


00 


Highway Department Loan 


2500 


00 


Electric Light Loan 


4050 


00 


Water Loan 


2150 


00 






$14200 on 


INTEREST ON DEBT 1920 




Central Fire Station Loan 


$ 350 


00 


Refunding Loan 


224 


00 


Winthrop School Loan 


680 


00 


Heating Plant Loan 


240 


00 


Water Front Improvement Loan 


84 


00 


State Guard Equipment Loan 


155 


00 


Highway Department Loan 


57 


50 


Electric Light Loan 


2442 


00 


Water Loan 


7831 


00 


Temporary Loans (estimated) 


3000 


00 

$15063 50 



IPSWICH TOWX REPORT 



77 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT* 





Uncollected 


Collected 


Uncollected 


Year 


Jan., 1919 


1919 


Abated Dec. 31, 1919 


1913 Tax 97 33 




$ 97 33 


1914 ' 


868 96 


5 60 


....... 863 36 


1915 ' 


631 08 


57 89 


$556 55 16 64 


1916 ' 


674 15 


645 10 


29 05 


1917 ' 


5955 77 


4968 71 


150 72 836 34 


1918 ' 


21372 58 


15300 30 


485 07 5587 21 


•1919 ' 


116094 53 


98316 22 


101 94 17676 37 




$119293 82 


$1294 28 $25106 30 



*Amount Committed. 

Amount of uncollected raxes, January, 1919 $29599 87 



78 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



BONDED DEBT 






Title of Loan 


Amount 




Payable 


Central Fire Station 


$ 8000 00 


Serially 


1920-1927 


Refunding 


5600 00 




1920-1927 


Winthrop School 


17000 00 




1920-1935 


Heating Plant 


6000 00 




1920-1931 


Water Front Improvement 


2100 00 




1920-1926 


State Guard Equipment 


3700 00 




1920 1923 


Highway Department 


2500 00 


1920 




Electric Light 


59950 00 


Serially 


1920-1938 


Water Notes 


35900 00 


< < 


1920-1936 


Water Bonds 


130000 00 


1924 




Water Bonds 


30000 00 


11)27 




Total Bonded Debt 


$300750 00 




Sinking Fund, Water Dept. $122025 20 






NET BONDED DEBT 


$178724 80 





TEMPORARY LOANS 
First National Bank, Ipswich $2000 00 
Sinking Fund, Water Dept. 5000 00 



May 15, 1920 
June 26, 1920 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



79 



List of Unpaid 19 J9 Bills. 

SELECTMEN 
Essex Book Binderv, binding reports $82 99 

D A Grady, auto hire 2 00 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

Ipswich Chronicle, advertising $25 00 

Dalton Adding Machine Co., baalnce due 7 00 



ASSESSORS 




John W Nourse, balance of salary 


$47 52 


TOWN HALL 




J H Sheppard, labor $ 


6 00 


Alonzo L Brown, laundry 


2 84 


Chas L Lovell, fuel 


68 84 


Angus I Savory, supplies 


1 20 


B J Conley, supplies 


9 00 


F E Wood, removing ashes 


5 50 


Ipswich Gasligljt Co, gas 


34 60 


George Hayes, plumbing 


9 85 


Water Department, water 


6 91 


A J Brenan, labor 


50 


POLICE 




John W Goodhue, supplies $ 


1 78 


Sundry persons, wages 


117 50 


N E Tel & Tel Co, telephone 


4 17 


H C Poor, labor 


14 00 


Cable Hospital, board 


2 00 


Chas S Garrette, supplies 


1 80 


B B Mansfield, M D, services 


7 00 


Heirs of S F Canney, use of camp 


10 00 


D A Grady, auto hire 


23 50 



$84 99 



$32 00 



$47 52 



$145 24 



$181 75 



80 IPSWICH TOWX REPORT 



FIRE 

Sundry persons balance of waues from 

May 1, 1919, to Dee. 31, 1919 $1233 34 



WEIGHTS AND .MEASURES 
Win A Stone, balance of 1919 salary 
American Railway Ex Co, express 
W & L E G-urley, supplies 
D A Grady, auto hire 
A C Damon, supplies 
F E Wood, use of team 



TREE WARDEN 
E Wood, use of horse $8 75 



RES 

$9 


70 




74 


3 


05 


7 


00 


4 


95 


3 


00 



HEALTH 

D A Grady, auto hire $ 2 00 

City of Salem, board and care 130 71 

Dept. Public Welfare, board and care 92 00 

W F Poole, groceries 24 00 

A C Damon, supplies 1 30 

American Railway Ex Co, expre 1 22 

Tougas & Tougas, groceries 12 00 

Hamilton Hardware Store, supplies 9 15 

EJM Scahill, transportation 96 00 

Geo A Schofield, insurance 45 00 

City of Boston, board and care 112 86 

Town Farm Dept., board 36 00 

Sundry Persons, loss of wages 131 00 

Sundry persons, guard duty 29 63 
Coburn Charitable Ass., services welfare 

nurse 350 00 
Comm. of Massachusetts, epidemic 

supplies 1800 00 



$1233 34 



$28 44 



$8 75 



$2872 87 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 81 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Water Dept., water - $20 28 

John W Goodhue, supplies 98 

A C Damon, supplies 4 35 



ESSEX ROAD 
\ J Bolles supplies $1 10 



OUT POOR DEPARTMENT 

City of Chicopee, board and care $65 76 

Mass. General Hospital, board and care 46 90 



EDUCATION 

A J Wilkinson & Co, supplies $73 48 

A H Peatfield, fuel 14 75 



$25 61 



$1 10 



$112 66 



$88 23 



Total unpaid bills $4862 50 



82 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



List of Town Property* 



School Houses 

Public Buildings 

Public Grounds 

Town Farm 

Cemeteries 

Heard Wharf 

Averoff Wharf 

Turkey Shore Pasture 

Woodland, Linebrook 

Woodland, Common Fields 

Thatch Bank, Great Flats 
• Thatch Bank, Third Creek 

Two Gravel Pits, Washington Street 

Fire Apparatus 

Highway Department 

In addition to the property enumerated above, there is 
the shore, beach and other property given to the Town by 
the Commoners, value of which is not estimated. The valu- 
ation of Water Works and Electric Lighting Plant will be 
found in the Water and Light Report. 



$120000 00 


40000 


00 


10000 


00 


30000 00 


5000 


00 


100 


00 


3250 


00 


1000 00 


200 00 


75 


04 


1500 


00 


15000 00 


6713 00 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 8:* 



Assessors Report 



APPROPRIATIONS. 




Education 


$49000 00 


Highways 


19000 00 


Electric Light Department 


10905 00 


Out Poor 


7700 00 


Fire Department 


6470 00 


Interest 


5495 50 


Police Department 


5200 00 


Town Farm 


4000 00 


Health Department 


3500 00 


Treasurer and Collector 


3275 00 


State Aid 


2500 00 


Town Hall 


2300 00 


Selectmen 


2275 00 


Water Department 


2237 50 


Cemeteries 


1800 00 


Auditing and Accounting 


1500 00 


Assessors 


900 00 


Town Clerk 


750 00 


Election and Registration 


550 00 


Tree Warden 


400 00 



84 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Parks 

Law Department 
Weights and Measures 
Forest Warden 
Shell Fish 
Essex Road 
Memorial Day 
Moth Work 



Total appropriations 

County Tax 

State Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Special State Tax 

Overlay for 1919 

Excess of abatements above overlay in 1916' 

Total amount to be raised 
Estimated income 



Non-resident Bank Tax 



Amount assessed on 1427 Polls 
Amount assessed on Property 

Amount of Personal Property assessed 
Amount of Real Estate assessed 
Value of buildings assessed 
\ T alue of land assessed 



375 00 
300 00 
210 00 
100 00 
200 00 

2000 00 
250 00 

2928 33 



$136121 33 


$136121 


33 


10635 


42 


14410 00 


4760 


50 


864 


60 


2000 


00 


148 55 


$168940 40 


53002 


48 


$115937 92 


466 


68 



$116404 60 

$ 2854 00 
113083 92 

$1328614 00 
4623131 00 
3287086 00 
1336045 00 



Number of horses 
" ' ' cows 



sheep 

other neat cattle 



344 

505 

61 

197 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 



85 



swine 

fowl 

acres of land 

persons assessed 

persons assessed on property 

persons assessed on poll only 

dwelling houses 
Rate of Taxation, $19.00 on $1000. 

Later assessments were as follows : 

On 46 polls 

On Personal Property 

On Real Estate 



L34 


4463 


17645 


2148 


1218 


930 


1301' 


$92 00 


21 38 


43 23 



JOHN W. NOURSE, 
RICHARD R. GLASIER, 
GEORGE FALL, 

Assessors 



86 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



Police Report* 



Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit to you the report of the 

duties performed by "the Police Department for the year 

ending December 31, 1919. 

Total number of arrests, 330. 

Arrests by months: January 24, February 26, March 31 ? 

April 9, May 51, June 40, July 47, August 30, September 

24, October 19, November 18, December 11. 

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIME. 

Drunkenn 117 

Gaming 7 

Larceny 12 

Non-support 2 

Violation of fish and game laws 7 

Assault and battery 11 

Bastardy 2 

Non-attendance at school 3 

Violation of town by-laws 9 

Making threats 1 

Violation of Auto law 68 

Keeping house of ill fame 1 

Lewdness 1 



ipswich town import 



Fornication 5 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 4 

Liquor nuisance 9 

Illegal sale of liquor 15 

Keeping- liquor with intent to sell 9 

Breach of peace 1 

Vagrancy 40 

Violation of Pure Food Law 1 

Adultery 1 

Operating auto under influence of liquor 2 

Violation of Short Weight La\v 1 

Violation of Board of Health Regulations 1 



Total 330 

Crimes against persons 12 

Crimes against property 12 

Crimes against public order 306 

Total 330 

DISPOSITION OF CASES. 

Fined 89 

Probated 54 

Committed to House of Correction 38 

Filed 35 

Appealed 13 

Continued 44 

Discharged 24 

Suspended 26 

Defaulted 6 

Held for Grand Jury 1 



Total 330 

STOLEN PROPERTY. 

Value of property reported stolen $410 00 

Value of property recovered 315 00 

LOST PROPERTY. 

Value of property reported lost $27 25 
Value of property recovered and restored to owners 27 25 



88 . IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 

Assistance rendered persons in distress lis 

Buildings found open and secured 24 

Complaints investigated 315 

Committed to Danvers Hospital 5 

Lost children restored to parents 7 

Number of dogs kitted 9 
Number of hours of special duty for private parties 1120 



INVENTORY OF POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Number of badges 14 

" " chain twisters 12 

" " electric light flashlights 5 

" " pairs of handcuffs 4 

" keys 30 

" " metal whistles 6 

"' " clubs 14 

Amount of fines received from the Third Dist. Court $656 30 

Amount of fines collected for the last quarter in 

hands of Court 219 25 



$875 55 
In submitting the above report I desire to take this op- 
portunity to extend my sincere thanks to the Board of Se- 
lectmen, Judge George H W Hayes and all other officials of 
the Court, Town Counsel Frank E Raymond, and to the offi- 
cers and all others who have assisted me in the performance 
of my official duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD LEAYITT, 

Chief of Police. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT «<) 



Engineers' Report* 



To the Selectmen of Ipswich : 

Following is the report of the Board of Engineers of 
the Fire Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1919 : 



No. of men in the Department 


40 


No. of box alarms 


12 


No. of still alarms 


31 


Total number of alarms 


43 


Property threatened by fire 


$31900 00 


Insurance on same 


7200 00 


Insurance paid 


6531 17 


Property loss 


15800 00 


Value of department equipment 


15000 00 


Value buildings occupied by dept. 


20000 00 


Value fire alarm equipment 


3500 00 


DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT 




Steamer 


1 


Hook and Ladder 


1 


Auto Combination Chemical and Hose 


1 


Hose Wagons 


2 


Hose Reels 


4 


Fire Alarm boxes 


19 


No. feet of hose 


5800 



90 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

We would recommend that the Town purchase a three 
way motor pumping engine at a cost not to exceed $10000.00 
or make some provisions to improve our present equip- 
ment. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, 
EDWIN M. POOLE, 

Engineers. 



IPSWICH TOWN RKPORT !)1 



Report Of The 

Sealer of Weights and Measures* 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present to you the annual report 
of the Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

This department comes directly under the supervision 
of the State Commissioner of Standards and it is his inten- 
tion at all times to broaden the scope of the Sealer's work. 
Every Sealer is supposed to make constant improvement as 
he acquires a larger experience. He is expected by the 
State Department to be steadily on the job, making inspec- 
tions and re-weighings and to see that the public gets hon- 
est weight and measure. 

While the Statute requires that devices for weighing 
and measuring used by dealers shall be annually tested and 
sealed or condemned in accordance with the result of such 
tests, the fact that a dealer is using a sealed weight or 
measure does not absolve him from liability when giving 
ort weight or measure. He is held strictly responsible 
to the public. 

All scales, weights and measures used for buying and 
selling, shipping, payment of wages, or any commercial use 
whatsoever, must be tested and sealed, and any person us- 






IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



ing scales, weights and measures that are not properly test- 
ed and sealed is liable to prosecution. 

"Whoever, himself or by his servant or agent or as the 
servant or agent of another person, gives or attempts to give 
false or insufficient weight or measure shall for a first of- 
fence be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars, 
for a second offence by a fine of not more than two hundred 
dollars, and for a subsequent offence by a fine of fifty dol- 
lars and by imprisonment for not less than thirty nor more 
than ninety days." (Chap. 394, Acts of 1907, as amended 
by Chap. 163, Acts of 1911.) 



Platform Scales over 5000 lbs. 


9 Sealed 


Platform Scales under 5000 lbs. 


56 ' 


3 Condemned 


Counter Scales 


29 ' 


1 1 


Beam Scales 


17 ' 




Spring Balance Scales 


45 - 


i 6 


Computing Scales 


28 ' 


i 2 


Slot Scales 


5 ' 


i 3 


Avoirdupois Weights 


397 ' 


' 40 Adjusted 


Dry Measures 


14 ' 




Liquid Measures 


115 ' 


4 Condemned 


Oil & Gasoline Pumps 


24 ' 


1 1 


Molasses Pumps 


7 ' 




Yard Sticks 


22 ' 


1 


Prescription Scales 


4 ' 




Apothecary Weights 


96 ' 




.Metric Weights 


67 ' 





Fees and adjusting charges collected and paid to Town 
Treasurer, $89.94. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM A. STONE, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



93 



Report of Superintendent of Streets* 



Board of Selectmen, 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Street De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1919: 
Team Xo. 1 worked 2296 hours @ $.90 $2066 40 
Team No. 2 worked 2208 hours @ $.90 1987 20 
Single Team worked 1280 hours @ $.25 320 00 

$4373 60 



Number of gallons of Oil on streets 14476 

Number of sq. yds. covered by same 77379 

Number of gallons of tarvia on streets 1200 

Number of sq. yds. covered by same 3158 

Cost of oil 

Cost of labor, teams, sand covering the same 

Cost of tarvia 

Cost of labor, teams, sand covering the same 



INVENTORY 



$817 13 

285 40 

144 00 

• 43 00 

$1289 53 



4 horses 

3 pr. double harness 
2 pr. street blankets 
2 pr. storm blankets 



$1300 00 

175 00 

50 00 

7 00 



94 IPSWK'II T 


OWN REPORT 


2 pr. stable blankets 


7 50 


3 two-horse carts 


375 00 


2 two-horse sleds 


100 00 


1 two-horse sweeper 


225 00 


3 road machines 


475 00 


4 road plows 


55 00 


12 gravel screens 


60 00 


2 two-horse shovels 


25 00 


3 stone drags 


15 00 


1 two-horse stone roll or 


40 00 


3 road drags 


40 00 


1 steam roller 


1000 00 


2 scarifiers 


300 00 


• 2 watering carts 


375 00 


7 snow plows 


175 00 


1 one-horse wagon 


60 00 


1 oil wagon 


600 00 


1 tar kettle 


45 00 


1 Ford truck 


250 00 


1 Albany jack 


13 50 


1 differential hoist 


25 00 


Snow fences 


120 00 


All other tools, etc., 


800 00 

d»R71Q Art 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH A. HUCKENS, 

Superintendent of Streets- 



[PSWICH TOWN REPORT 95 



Report of the Overseers' of the Poor* 



OUT POOR DEPARTMENT. 

The appropriation for L919 was $7706.40; the amount 
expended, $5567.62; leaving a balance of $2138.78 to be re- 
turned to the town treasury. This is the best showing made 
in the Out Poor Department for many years. 

Four causes have contributed to this highly satisfactory 
result, viz: The prevailing good times, the war prohibition, 
the work of supervision, and the policy of education. 

During the past year, work was plentiful and wages 
high. No person phyi ically tit was unable to find employ- 
ment. In fact, the work generally sought the worker, and 
he had opportunity to choose that which was most to his 
liking and to demand a large return for his labor. This was 
not all gain, however, because the high cost of commodities 
offset in a measure the high wages. And again, the phy- 
sically unfit and the widow with small children were not 
able to take advantage of the high wages, while the town 
was compelled to pay the higher cost of their support. Nev- 
ertheless, there has been gain from the cause mentioned, 
and this has helped to reduce the expense of the Out Poor 
Department. 

While liquor did not wholly disappear under war-time 



m IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

prohibition, yet it was not so easily to be obtained. As a 
result, there was marked improvement in many homes. Men 
improved in health, ambition returned, they went to work, 
kept steadily at it, and spent their money upon the family 
instead of upon themselves, thus manfully assuming their 
obligations instead of thrusting them upon the town. These 
facts were noted by all charitable workers, whether public 
or private. For several months we have not received an ap- 
plication for aid where the distress was immediately trace- 
able to drink. 

The work of this department has been closely super- 
vised. Applications for aid have been carefully examined 
and relief extended only where need actually existed. The 
cases, have been followed up and aid withdrawn as soon as 
the distress has passed. The tax-payers' money has been 
well handled, as will be seen by the large amount remain- 
ing unexpended. Still, the policy has not been niggardly ; 
for, while there has been no needless waste, the deserving- 
poor have not been allowed to suffer Brain and heart have 
worked together with gratifying results. 

The continued policy of education is bearing fruit, and 
the people are learniiig the valuable le son of self-support 
and self-respect. The fact is dawning upon minds 

that, while the town is ever ready to help those who arc 
unable to help themselves, it docs not wish to be imposed 
upon. The atmosphere is clearing and light is beiu^; seen 
ahead. The shirker is learning to be I 1 the 

worker, instead of spending all, is being taught to save the 
proverbial penny for the rainy day. Those who fall into 
temporary distres learning to look to their credit in- 

stead of to the town; and those who have a hidden store, 
to draw upon it and not upon the town treasury. Children 
who have passed school a.^e are learning that they have a 
duty to needy parents which must no1 be neglected. 

The policy of education is helping to save the public 
funds and prevent the pauperization of the people. 

Is it too much to ask well-meaning citizens not to be 
too ready to give their, sometimes mistaken sympathy to 
those who have been denied aid! Why should they not first 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 1)7 

consult the Overseers and hear their side of the story? If 
such persons have information to imparl which will help in 
the work of investigation, the Board will be only too glad 
to receive it. 

While the needs of the coming year cannol be foretold, 
yet from pre: cut indications the Overseers feel warranted 
in recommending a considerably smaller appropriation than 
was made last year. 

TOWN FARM DEPARTMENT. 

The appropriation for the Farm was $4000.00; the ex- 
penditures, $3991.54; leaving a small balance of $8.46. The 
net cost of maintaining each inmate per wei •; $4.06, a 

decrease of 12 cents from 1918. The total number of in- 
mates registered for 1919 was 16 ; the average number dur- 
ing the year was 10. 

The inventory of stock, tools, produce, etc., on Decem- 
ber 31, 1919, showed an increase of $554.75 over the prev- 
ious year. Jn addition, a one-story carriage phed, dairy 
workshop and harness room combined, 54 feet long, and 18 
feet wide, was built mostly of second-hand stock over the 
cellar of, the shed which was lurried in 1912. This afford 1 
abundant storage for the root crops, of which there were 
600 bushels of mangles, our stock oi potatoes, and a large 
quantity of carrots, turnips, beets, etc., for the house and 
feed for the stock. The building alone is insurable for 
$1000. 

The farming operations, with exception of the potato 
crop which was damaged by the continuous fall rains, were 
more than usually successful. 250 bushels of corn on the 
cob were stored, and 65 tons of English hay, estimated. The 
time is not far distant when extra barn room will be needed 
for the housing of the stock and hay. The apple orchard of 
young trees is doing well, and in the course of two or three 
years the income from this source will help to still further* 
reduce the net expense. We are making haste slowly yet 
surely; there is no plunging, no trying of doubtful experi- 
ments; and the gradual decrease of the cost from year to 
year is evidence that we are moving along right lines. 



98 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

The work in the house is being carried forward in a 
satisfactory manner. There is always enough for all, yel 
no waste nor extravagance is apparent. The new heating 
plant will fill a long felt want and add greatly to the 
fort of the Home. It should also mean a saving in fuel ex- 
pense. The appropriation of $325.00 for the installing of a 
telephone remains unused, because Ave could not get the 
Company to consider the matter under existing conditions, 
and the amount would have been insufficient if the C 
pany had been ready to do the work. Most of the build- 
ings have been removed from the approach to the Home, the 
litter cleared away, trees trimmed, etc., and the place pre- 
sents a neat and attractive appearance as first seen by the 
visitor. 

The Overseers are working in perfect harmony; the 
Superintendent is capable and efficient ; the Matron is all 
that could be desired; the farm hand and his wife, Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Baylan, are daily proving their worth ; and 
the inmates who are capable of rendering service are to be 
complimented for the willingness to aid to the extent of 
their ability. 

A few more years' continuance of the present plan un- 
der the same management, will prove that the Town Farm 
can be maintained at very small expense to the tax-payers. 
As it is, we do not know where else or how the inmates 
could be housed, fed, clothed, supplied with medical at- 
tendance, etc., at the low cost of $4.06 per week, and Ave 
expect to reduce this amount the coming year. 

State Inspector BardAvell says that any almshouse that 
can reduce the Aveekly expense in these times beloAv $5.00 
per inmate is doing remarkably well. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK T. GOODHUE, 
JOHN G. SPERLING, 
CHARLES G. HULL, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



IPSWICH TOWN KKPORT 99 



Selectmen's Report* 



We feel that the time has come when the Town should 
make some changes. The cost of labor and teams makes it 
imperative that some cheaper and more rapid method of 
handling road material be provided- We recommend that 
a gasoline gravel loading machine be purchased at a cost of 
about $750.00 and at least one. auto truck, for carrying and 
spreading gravel at a cost of $3200.00. ' After investigations 
lasting more than a year your Selectmen are satisfied that 
this is the only solution of economical road building and re- 
pairs in Ipswich. More new construction should be made 
and some macadam oil binder should be applied before the 
road is used. It would be an advantage to the Town to have 
an oil tank to store material so that we could apply when 
needed and in proper condition. More money must be ap- 
propriated and spent upon our roads if we are to keep up 
the reputation of the Town in the past. The changed con- 
ditions in their use is ample justification for this statement. 

We would recommend that the Selectmen or some other 
agent be appointed and instructed by the Town to pur- 



100 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

chase supplies for the Town, particularly coal for all town 
buildings. As a large saving of time and money could be 
made for the people and the auto truck and gravel loader 
we have recommended could be u: ed to great advantage in 
handling it. 

We feel that it would be of advantage to the people 
and the Town itself if the Electric Light Commissioners 
would make arrangements to purchase its oavii supplies 
direct and materials, fixtures and electrical equipment fur- 
nished to the people at cost plus handling charges as was 
done a few years ago. 

It has been difficult during the past few years to find 
people willing to serve as Field Drivers. The law now calls 
for their appointment by the Selectmen. This year, after 
a long search for some one to serve in this capacity, Ave fell 
back upon the police and appointed them with very satis- 
factory results. The great drawback was the lack of a 
pound, and we would recommend that the Selectmen be au- 
thorized and instructed to provide one or more suitable 
places for impounding cattle. 

FRANK W KYES, 
EBEN B. MOULTON, 
JOHN A. BROWN, 

Selectmen of Ipswich. 



IPSWICH town REPORT 



Town Clerk's Report* 



To the Selectmen of Ipswich, 

Gentlemen : — In submitting myarinual report for your 
consideration, I would again state what I have done in pa i 
years : That is the fact that more room, and fire-proof at 
that, is needed for the placing of the Records of the Town. 
Those records must be preserved and kept in a place of se- 
curity. The vault in the office of the Clerk and Treasurer is 
now T in use by both offices and is crowded to overflowing 
with the books, papers and documents of both offices. There 
is also in the store-room a large number of books and docu- 
ments that should be put in a more secure place, that is, in 
a word, they should be in a fire-proof room or vault. I am 
not proposing any appropriation, for the reason that I am 
not familiar enough with the construction of such places to 
speak with any authority. Let it be understood that these 
books and documents have more than a passing value, and 
are as well required by law to be kept, as by the will of the 
inhabitants of the town. I have books now in the hands 
of the book binders, being rebound, as they could not be 
used any longer as they were, and others must follow as soon 
as those are received. 

The vital statistics show a decrease in marriages and 
deaths over former years, but the birth rate shows in ere n 



102 IPSWICH TOWX UKPORT 



I submit the following figures: 






Whole number of births reported 




195 


Fathers native born 


54 




Fathers foreign born 


139 




Fathers unknown 


2 


195 


Mothers native born 


51 




Mothers foreign born 


144 


195 


Living in Ipswich 




179 


Other places 




16 


Marriages returned to the office 




76 


Grooms born in U. S. 


34 




Grooms born in foreign countries 


42 


76 


Brides born in U. S. 


29 




Brides born in foreign countries 


47 


76 


Grooms residing in Ipswich 


58 




In other places 


18 


76 


Brides residing in Ipswich 


63 




In other places 


13 


76 


Deaths as returned 




91 


Males 


51 




Females 


40 




Oldest person, James T. Mann, 


90 yrs. 7 mos. 


7 days. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 103 

Over 80 years: 

Emily A. Harris 89 yrs. 5 mos. 29 days 

Catherine D. Clarke 86 yrs, 

William H. Kirk 87 yrs. 8 days 

Nathaniel Rust 85 yrs. llmos. 12 days 

Margaret E. Story 85 yrs. 1 mo. 6 days 

Maria Mann 85 yrs. 

Margaret B. Johnson 82 yrs. 8 mos. 1 day 

Sarah P. Caldwell 86 yrs. 8 mos. 26 days 

Henry Stone 82 yrs. 3 mos. 27 days 

Caroline McHale 82 yrs. 

Stephen Jewett 81 yrs. 

Licenses issued as follows: 

Resident hunters' certificates 232 

Unnaturalized foreign hunters' certificates 1 

Resident fishermen 13 

Non-resident lobster fisherman 1 

Trappers' licenses, minors 49 

Liquor licenses 4 

Billiards and pool 9 

Hotel and victuallers 10 

Junk dealers 5 

Auctioneer's license 1 

As will be seen the work of the Clerk's office continues 

to grow and to demand more attention as time passes. Much 

is now required of the Clerk that was unknown in former 

years, and those calls and demands are of such character 

that they must be considered and receive the attention they 

require. 

CHARLES W. BAMFORD, 
Town Clerk. 
Ipswich, February 9th, 1920. 



704 IPSWICH TOWN' REPORT 



Report of the Board of Health 

For 1919, 



Chapter 75, Sections 49, 50 and 52 of the Revised Laws 
require that all diseases dangerous to the public health shall 
be reported by the attending- physician within twenty-four 
hours of their occurrence. Thirty-seven diseases are in- 
cluded in that list. These diseases must also be reported 
immediately by the local board to the State Department oi 
Health. Following is the list for the year: 

Chicken Pox 6 

Diphtheria 11 

Opthalmia Neonatorum 1 

Mumps 1 

Scarlet Fever 34 

Tuberculosis 10 

Poleo-Myelitis 1 

Influenza 2 

Lobar Pneumonia 2 

Croupous Pneumonia 1 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 105 



Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 



Total 70 

There were no deaths from any of these diseases. 

While it is most important that the best of care and sur- 
veillance be maintained when such diseases occur, it is still 
more vitally important that everything possible be done to 
prevent their occurrence. 

In the year just closed this department has had to meet 
some rather unusual conditions. While the diseases dan- 
gerous to the public health have been less in number than 
in any recent year, and while there have been no deaths 
from any of these diseases, nevertheless, conditions have 
arisen when quick and sometimes drastic action wa^ neces- 
sary to prevent the spread of diseases where, had not such 
action been taken, serious consequences would probably 
have resulted. 

With only seventy such cases reported to the depart- 
ment with no deaths resulting, it looks on the surface like a 
very good showing. But when it is shown that there were 
eleven cases of diphtheria and thirty-four cases of scarlet 
fever, and that 90% of these were cases among our alien 
population, whose knowledge of the English language is lim- 
ited ; a population that for the past fifteen years has seemed 
to possess an immunity from these diseases, the significance 
of the situation with which the department has had to deal, 
becomes apparent. We have been fortunate in this connec- 
tion to have been able to arrange with the Salem Health 
Department to take care of most of the cases of diphtheria 
and scarlet fever at their hospital for contagious diseases, 
and the Board hereby gives expression of its appreciation 
to the Salem Health Department, and to Health Officer 



106 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

McGrath for the prompt, efficient and able service rendered 
the Town of Ipswich. Had not their service been available 
it would not have been possible to isolate these cases, and 
reduce as was done to a minimum the spread of these dis- 
eases. There have been several occasions where it was 
deemed necessary to maintain a rigid quarantine, sometimes 
for several days while cultures were being made or while 
awaiting an available bed in the hospital. This quarantine, 
while expensive, was deemed by the Board to be vitally 
necessary. At this writing, Feb. 1st, we still have cases in 
the hospital and also houses under quarantine. Xo one can 
tell how long these conditions will prevail. 

Several sanitary conditions have been carefully looked 
after. There are always places that are bad, but when we 
consider that Ave have a mixed population, and the fact that 
the town is without a system of sewerage, we can only draw 
the inference that the town has been fortunate. This con- 
dition of good fortune cannot be expected to go on forever. 
Overcrowding is on the increase in some tenement sections, 
a condition to be expected in a community where there is 
plenty of work and a shortage of housing accommodations. 
Practically no houses have been built since the war began, 
and our population has increased during that period. With 
constantly increasing conditions of overcrowding the neces- 
sity for a proper system of sewerage becomes imperative if 
the town is to do the plain duty of conserving the health of 
its people. We feel that the town wishes to do this, but that 
it never will do it until it awakens to the necessity. It is 
time to wake up and do something. A survey was made 
several years ago and plans were drawn, but no action was 
ever taken. It is time that something be done along these 
lines. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 107 

Below are given the reports of the Agent and Milk 
Inspector, which show the scope of the work done by them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. MaeARTHUR, 
AARON LORD, 
GEORGE W. SMITH, 

Board of Health. 
Ipswich, Feb. 1st, 1920. 



Agent's Report 



Number of complaints received and investigated 

during the year 48 

Contagious disease cards posted as follows: 

Diphtheria 7 

Scarlet Fever . . 31 

Poleo-myelitis 1 

Cerebro-spinal meningitis 1 

Measles 1 

Dead animals buried or otherwise disposed of: 

Dogs 5 

Cats 3 

Hens • 6 

Respectfully submitted, 

AARON LORD, Agent. 
Feb. 1, 1920. 



108 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR 



As regards to the milk situation there doe . not seem 
to be any report needed, for so far as I can i ee the same ca 
is being used by the producers as in former years, and so I 
can only repeat what I have said in my reports for the pre- 
vious years past. 

No reports have been made to me about the milk which 
is being distributed, which seems that is sufficient proof that 
our milk supply is being kept up to the standard, and the 
same may be said as regards to the ice cream situation, as 
all places where same is sold are in a clean and sanitary con- 
dition as found after a careful inspection. 
Number of milk licenses issued 16 

Number of ice cream licenses issuel 15 

Oleomargarine dealers registered 14 

Amount received from all fees $20.50 

Respectfully submitted, 
GEORGE W. SMITH, 

Milk Inspector. 

Jan. 5, 1920. 



IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 109 



DIVISION OF CHILD WELFARE 



Report of the Director 

In presenting the fourth annual report of this division 
the Director is much gratified to announce that there has been 
a material lowering of the mortality rate among children 
under one year of age since this work was begun in the 
summer of 1916. Below is given the figures of the birth 
rate for each year since that time, together with the death 
rate of children under one year, as follows : 

Year Births Deaths 

1915 118 23 

1916 138 27 

1917 155 24 

1918 194 24 

1919 195 21 

It will be seen by the above figures that about 19% 
of the children born in 1916 died under one year of age, 
while in 1919 only about 10% died, a reduction of about 
48%. Had the percentage been the same in 1919 that it was 
in 1916 there would have been 37 deaths instead of 21. The 
rate has been lowered each year. This did not simply hap- 
pen, but was the result of a vast amount of intensive work 
carried on with that end in view. 

With the above showing it can be seen that the mor- 
tality rate has been very materially lowered in four years 
time. We hope to make an even better showing another 
year. 

Below is given a summary of the work done by the 
welfare nurse for the year. It will be seen that she made 
372 pre-natal visits to expectant mothers. This work al- 



110 IPSWICH TOWN REPORT 

ready shows promise of excellent results in the future, and 
is perhaps the most important work now being done for in- 
fant welfare. 

Cases brought forward 401 

New cases 173 

Discharged 81 

Moved away 14 

By death 11 

Over age 56 

Still under care 493 

Home visits 2,913 

Pre-natal visits 372 

Hours in Dispensary 64V2 

Babies weighed and measured 89 

Too much credit cannot be given Miss Stewart for the 
manner in which she has carried on this work, co-ordina- 
ting it with the work she has done in the schools. Ipswich 
is more fortunate than many towns in having the facilities 
it has for carrying on constructive health work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. MacARTHUR, 

Director. 
Ipswich, Feb. 1st, 1920. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 



TWENTY-SIXTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

WATER 

AND 

MUNICIPAL LIGHTING 

COMMISSIONERS 




FOR THE YEAR 1919. 



IPSWICH, MASS. 
G. A. SCHOFIELD & SON, PRINTERS, 
686 



1919 



WATEK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



Officers of 

Water and Municipal Lighting 

Commission. 



COMMISSIONERS 



ARTHUR H. WALTOX, Chairman Term expires 1921 

WALTER G. BROWX Term expires 1922 

WILLIAM H. RAXD Term expires 1920 

CLERK 

ARTHUR H. WALTOX Office, Room 5, Town House 

Office hours from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. every week day 

except Saturday. Telephone 92-R. 

TREASURER « 

WILLIAM J. RILEY Office at Town House 

Manager Electric Light, Arthur H. Walton 

Chief Engineer, Edmund A. Russell 

Line Superintendent, Electric Light, C. J. Dupray 

Foreman. Water Department, William P. Gould 



Office of Commissioners, Room 5, Town House 

Meetings held every Friday at 8 P. M. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT. 

PIPE LINE 

LIST OF BTLT S AND AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1919. 

Paid to Amount 



Chapman Valve Co., supplies ' $181 40 



SERVICE PIPE 
Crane Co, pipe & fittinsrs 
United Brass Co. pipe & fittii 
Bingham & Taylor, pipe & fitting 
Chadwick Boston Lead Co, pipe &» fittings 
William P Gould, labor 
Adam Zuek. labor 
John McLaughlin, labor 
Daniel McGuire, labor 



MAINTENANCE 

William P Gould, labor 
Albert Willard, labor 
John Douglass, labor 
V E Rust, Jr. labor 
Louis Kelly, labor 
George Day. labor 
Charles Rust, labor 
Adam Zuek, labor' 
William Walton, labor 
Horace Ellsworth, labor 



$181 40 



$126 58 


95 


70 


40 


38 


58 


95 


96 


00 


18 00 


39 


25 


37 


25 


$512 11 


$1167 


20 


3 00 


10 


00 


14 00 


7 


50 


4 


00 


6 


40 


51 


20 


1 


50 


40 


00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT* 5 

Paid to Amount 

William P Edgerly, labor 83 33 

Electric Light Dept, labor 1 7 75 

A J Brennan, supplies 1 00 
National Meter Co, supplies 

P E Wood, teaming 68 87 

Hersey Mfg Co, supplies 5 67 

William P Reilley, oil 2 20 

Manzur & Damon, repairs 59 37 

Joseph King, repairs 8 24 

American Express Co, expre 5 32 

L F Brown, supplies 10 80 

A H Walton, paid out 3 00 

Buffalo Meter Co, supplies 15 60 

George Fall, fuel 3 50 

Crane Co, supplies 26 63 

Shawmut Chemical Co, supplies 33 60 

A C Damon, supplies 10 00 

John Jennings & Son, repairs 470 00 

J W Goodhue, supplies 30 94 

C F Chapman & Son, supplies 2 90 

B & M R R, freight ' 1 90 

Cannev Lumber Co, supplies 36 62 

DM Dillon Boiler Co, supplies . 58 11 

Walworth Mfg Co, supplies 7 52 

E Howard Clock Co, supplies 13 75 

Worthington Pump Co, supplies 3 60 

G P Anderson Co, supplies 7 52 

United States Rubber Co, supplies 8 40 

Austin L Lord, repairs 23 20 

Warren Steam Pump Co, supplies 2 19 

H I Coggeshall, supplies • 12 20 

Geo E Gilchrist, supplies 12 87 

Electric Light Dept, pumping 3000 00 

Cotton & Woolen Ins Co, insurance 50 00 

Geo A Schofield, insurance 20 70 

Damon & Damon, insurance 74 07 

Mutual Boiler Ins Co, insurance 40 00 

A A Jewett, bookkeeper 324 00 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



Paid to 

A H Walton, clerk & manager 

William H Rand, commissioner 

A H Walton, commissioner 

Walter G Brown, commissioner 

G H W Haye/', commissioner 

J H Lakeman, postage 

G A Schofield & Son, printing 

N E T & T Co, telephone 

G H W Hayes, bond 



Amount 


650 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


80 


55 


19 


45 


85 


37 


119 


00 


30 


50 


40 00 



$7118 69 



NOTE PAYMENT 
Notes paid by Treasurer $2150 00 

INTEREST 

Interest paid various parties by Treasurer $7917 00 

Sinking Fund $4840 88 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR 


ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1919 




Receipts 




Disbursements 


Bal. Dec. 31, 1918 $ 2520 45 


Maintenance 


$7118 69 


Water Rates 14506 


11 


Services 


512 11 


Services 334 


37 


Pipe Line 


181 40 


Appro note paym't 2150 


00 


Interest 


7917 00 


Appro hydrant serv 2237 


50 


Note Payment 


2150 00 


Misc. water 123 


82 


Sinking Fund 


4840 88 


Misc. receipts 144 62 






Insurance dividend 45 00 






$22061 87 




Deficit 658 


21 






$22720 08 


$22720 08 


BALANCE SHEET FOR YEAR ENDING DEC 


. 31, 1919 


Bonds issued $160000 


00 


Engineering ! 


$ 3350 00 


Xotes outstanding 35900 


00 


! and damages 


3599 12 


Prem. on bonds 10412 


58 


Pumping /Station 


14425 24 


Prem. on notes 60 


25 


Pumps & mach. 


19637 65 


Appropriations 35461 


70 


Storage Basin 


27693 59 


Misc. receipts 165 


43 


Bull Brook 


1778 60 


Water rates 283626 


61 


Distrib. reservoir 


17827 56 


Filter appro. 143 


28 


»Pipe Line const. 


125321 52 


Appro, notes pay. 14039 


75 


Service Pipe cons. 


22170 79 






Store House 


178 70 






Miscellaneous 
( /Ost of const. 


2834 20 




238816 97 






Int on Bonds 


165581 20 






Maintenance 


95247 24 






Material on hand 


1667 82 






Water rates due 
Services due 


5091 90 
131 11 


$539809 60 


Deficit 658 


21 


Sink'g Fund pym 

< 


t 33931 57 


$540467 81 


$540467 81 



WATEW COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



SUMMARY OF COST OF CONSTRUCTION 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1919 



Construction Account 


Dec. 31, 


1918 


Dec. 11, 1919 


Engineering $ 3350 00 






$ 3350 00 


Land dam^s & rts of way 3599 12 






3599 12 


Pumping Station 14425 24 






14425 24 


Pumps and machinery 19637 65 






19637 65 


Storage Basin 27693 59 






27693 59 


Bull Brook Supply 1778 60 






1778 60 


Distributing reservoir 17827 56 






17827 56 


Pipe Line Construction 125195 62 


$125 < 


125321 52 


Service Pipe Construction 21961 84 


208 


95 


22170 79 


Store House 178 70 






178 70 


Miscellaneous 2834 20 






2834 20 


$238482 12 


$334 85 


$238816 97 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



9 





SINKING FUND 




Receipts 


Investments 


Appro. 1895 


$1700 00 


Ipswich Sav Bk $ 


127 56 


1896 


1759 50 


Ips. Water Loan 


53400 00 


1897 


1899 08 


Ips. El ee Lt notes 


23700 00 


1898 


1965 55 


Ips. Town Notes 


13100 00 


1899 


2032 00 


111 Cent R R 3i/ 2 s 


3000 00 


1900 


2138 65 


First Nat Bank 


4197 64 


1901 


2363 50 ' 


Lib Loan Bonds 


24500 00 


1902 


2446 22 






1903 


2531 84 






1904 


2680 32 






1905 


2890 91 






1906 


2986 47 






1907 


3084 00 






1908 


3418 34 






1909 


3656 61 






1910 


3671 99 






From prof 1911 


3784 73 






1912 


3901 40 






1913 


4022 17 






1914 


4146 45 






1915 


4276 52 






1916 


4410 42 






1917 


4549 00 






Appro. 1918 


4692 43 






From prof 1919 


4840 88 






Interest 


41944 00 






Profit on bonds 


232 22 


$: 






$122025 20 


L22025 20 



10 



WATER COMMISSIONERS ' REPORT 



Superintendent's Report* 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

Gentlemen: — Following is the report f op the year end- 
ing December 31, 1919. 

MAIN PIPES 

The number of feet of mains laid to date and sizes are 

1,505 
10,963 
8,830 
17,897 
81,746 
3,708 
9,920 
2,070 
Total, 136,659=25 miles, 4,659 feet, 

STREET GATES 
Total number now set is 157 

HYDRANTS 
They are in good working order, the total now set is as 
follows : 

Town 179 

Private 15 



as follows 








14 


inch 




12 


inch 




10 


inch 




8 


inch 




6 


inch 




4 


inch 




2 


inch 




1 


inch 



Total 



194 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 11 

SERVICE PIPES 

Ten services have been added this year. Total number 
services connected with the works to date, 1070. 

Following is an account of the number of services add- 
ed, also the number of feet of service pipe laid (by 3 
since the works were put in : 

No. ser- Town Private T tal 

Year vices added Ft. In. Ft- In. Ft. In. 

1894 181 4,470 4 2,771 2 7,241 

1895 218 5,312 3 6,051 5 11,363 8 

1896 110 2,391 9 2,616 5 5,008 2 

1897 32 896 6 1,991 6 2,288 

1898 42 1,112 7 1,318 3 2,430 10 

1899 34 841 2 1,335 10 2,177 
1900* 30 641 2 2,741 4 3,382 6 

1901 25 517 4 1,209 5 1,726 9 

1902 25 580 1 3,657 2 4,237 3 

1903 19 800 1 1,589 1 2,389 2 

1904 17 367 5 263 2 630 7 

1905 30 1,172 7 443 1 1,615 8 

1906 22 454 233 5 687 5 

1907 49 986 9 625 8 1,612 5 

1908 38 715 3 464 8 1,179 11 

1909 31 653 5 336 9 990 2 

1910 35 765 819 1,584 

1911 15 345 5 271 11 617 4 

1912 13 • 328 8 188 10 517 6 

1913 16 526 350 876 

1914 15 262 5 146 2 408 7 

1915 25 451 9 145 10 597 7 

1916 19 374 3 254 2 628 5 

1917 12 225 5 172 5 397 10 

1918 6 116 102 9 218 9 

1919 10 168 4 202 310 4 



1,070 24,766 11 30,401 9 54,868 8 

Total, 54,868 feet, 8 inches=10 miles, 2,063 feet. 
The service pipes are cast iron, lead and galvanized iron 
from 3-4 inch to 4 inches. 



12 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PUMPING RECORD FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1919 









Total 


Average 


1919 


Total 


number gallons 


number gals. 




pumping time 


of water pumped 


water pumped 




per month 


per month 


per day 


Month 


Hrs.Min. 


Gallons 


Gallons 


January 


167 




8,976,825 


289,575 


February 


150 


45 


7,932,975 


283,321 


March 


157 


30 


8,154,975 


263,064 


April 


159 


35 


8,270,050 


275,668 


May 


174 


5 


9,146,850 


295,059 


June 


226 




12,068,100 


402,270 


July 


252 


30 


13,262,475 


427,821 


August 


226 




12,195,300 


393.397 


September 


213 


15 


11,578,275 


385,942 


October 


213 




11,444,325 


369,171 


November 


159 


30 


8,360,100 


278,670 


December 


223 


45 


11,796,975 


380,548 


Total for year 


2322 


55 


123,187,225 




Daily av. for year 








337,499 



Estimated amount of coal used during the year, 177 
tons, 898 pounds. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 13 

METERS 

Total number of meters in use as follows: 



NAME 








Sizes 








3 in. 


2 in. 


iy 2 


in. 


lin- 


% in. 


Totals 


Crown 


4 


8 


4 




5 


42 


63 


Empire 










1 


57 


58 


Hersey 










3 


34 


37 


Lambert 




2 






2 


21 


25 


Niagara 






1 






69 


70 


Nash 










6 


213 


219 


Worthington 










2 


11 


13 


Columbia 












2 


2 


Elevator 












2 


2 



10 5 19 451 489 



14 WATER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



Treasurer's Report* 



WATER DEPARTMENT, TOWN OF IPSWICH 


WILLIAM J. RILEY, 


TREASURER 




DR r 






To cash on hand, January, 1919 


$2520 45 




To amounts received: 






Fixture rates 


6475 55 




Meter rates 


8030 56 




Miscellaneous 


549 56 




Insurance dividend 


45 00 




Construction 


19 70 




Service Pipe Supplies 


33 55 




Hydrant Appropriation 


2237 50 


$19911 87 






DEFICIT 




658 21 




$20570 08 


CR. 






By paid: 






Commissioners ' orders 


$12653 08 




Interest 


7917 00 


$20570 08 



The treasurer has the following bills for collection 
Fixture rates $1365 36 

Meter rates 860 01 

Little Neck 312 00 

Miscellaneous 131 11 



$2668 48 
Meter commitment December 31, 1919 2554 53 



$5223 01 



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MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 17 



Electric Light Department. 

CONSTRUCTION EXPENSES. 

The following bills have been paid for construction dur- 
ing the year 1919. 

Paid to Amount 



C J Dupray, labor 


$398 39 


! II Sheppard, labor 


272 46 


A D Mallard, labor 


254 70 


Charles Strout, labor 


88 20 


Edward Brooks, labor 


98 00 


Henry Lavoie, labor 


101 20 


Leslie Dupray, labor 


207 60 


Fred Davis, labor 


28 00 


•Tohn Singer, labor 


18 95 


Ipswich Millr, labor 


13 50 


Pettingell Andrews, supplies 


4086 11 


\ more Savage Co, supplies 


1696 11 


J W Goodhue, supplies 


10 50 


Geo L Buckminster Co, supplies 


63 25 


J ! Merrill, supplies 


30 74 


F E Wood, teaming 


74 89 


Edmund Wile, teaming 


78 75 


B & M R R, freight 


320 00 


American Express, express 


5 87 


Peoples Express, express 


2 84 



18 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Paid 'to 



Amount 



N E T & T Co, telephone ' 
Wetmore Savage Co, transform* 
E L Blaisdell, 1 rmers 

era! Electric ipplies 

•1 -J Merrill, supplies 
Stuarl Howla pplies 



30 01 

401 20 

2 25 

785 55 

358 90 

64 80 



DR. 



VSTRIVTION ACCOUNT 



$9492 77 
CR. 



To balance, 1918 $2930 28 By bills paid 

To Depreciation appro. 3150 00 By balance 
To sale of note 6000 00 

To cash.. Private en. 166 30 



si 224< 



$9642 77 
2603 81 



$12246 58 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION 



Dec. 31, '1- Year 1919 Total 

t of Real Estate $ 8117 19 $ 8117 19 

Cost of Steam Plant 16431 1- 16431 18 

Cost of Electric Lines 75730 77 $9642 77 85373 54 

Cost of Electric Plant 10008 54 10008 5 4 

$110287 68 $9642 77 $119930 45 

NOTES AND INTEREST 



Interest paid 1919 by Treasurer 
Notes paid 1919 by Treasurer 



$2284 00 
3550 00 



DR. 



NOTE INDEBTEDNESS 



CR. 



To notes outstanding By notes paid 1919 $3550 00 

Jan. 1,1919 $57500 00 By bal. outstand- 

To note authorized in£ Jan. 1, 19 59950 00 

in 1919 6000 00 



$63500 00 



$63500 00 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



19 



Manager's Report* 



To the W after and Municipal Lighting Commission. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit the following report of the receipts and ex- 
penses of the Lighting Plain for the year 1919. 

MAINTENANCE 



Paid to 



Labor 



Edmund Russell, engin 
F W Fiske, engineer 

irge E Brown, engineer 
Everett Guilford, fireman 
George L Fall, fireman 
E 01 instead, fireman 
R B Piekard, fireman 
Fred C Rust, fireman 
Wm P Edgerly, fireman 
C J Dupray, electrician 
J H Sheppard, electrician 

Total 



Fuel 



B & M R R, coal 

John A Brown, coal 

Atkinson Coal Co. coal 

Rees Jenkins, coal 

W W "Walton, trimming coal 

Geo B Courtis, teaming coal 

Chas L Lovell, coal 

Felix Wegzyn, teaming coal 

James Sheppard, teaming coal 



Amount 



$1545 82 


1024 32 


1479 


27 


196 


00 


1326 


90 


959 


93 


1151 


52 


1158 


27 


1048 


18 


937 


27 


878 


62 


$11706 10 


$5429 39 


153 


15 


4783 


83 


259 


78 


109 


68 


691 


70 


68 


59 


49 


36 


30 28 


$11575 


76 



20 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Paid to 



Amount 



Miscellaneous 

G A Schofield, insurance $666 87 

Cotton & Woolen Mfg Ins Co, insurance 100 00 

G A Schofield Jr, insurance 12 60 

Damon & Damon, insurance 452 04 

N -J Bolles, repairs steam plant 2 44 

Ames Iron Works, repairs steam plant 24 90 

G W Knowlton Rubber Co, repairs steam plant 10 32 

United States Rubber Co, repairs steam plant 3 99 

Garlock Packing Co, repairs steam plant 2 47 

C F Chapman & Son, repairs steam plant 1 90 

G P Anderson, repairs electric plant 7 00 

C F Chapman & Son, repairs electric plant 11 20 

General Electric Co, repairs electric plant 3 32 

X J Bolles, repairs electric plant 1 40 

C S Tyler, repairs electric plant 10 71 

General Electric Co, repairs electric plant 3 92 

J J Merrill, repairs' electric plant 38 18 

G W Knowlton Rubber Co, repairs electric plant 9 10 

John McLaughlin, repairs lines 20 00 

Daniel Maguire, repairs lines 20 00 

C F Chapman & Son, repairs lines 19 11 

J W Goodhue, repairs lines 25 47 

A C Damon, repairs lines 55 

American Express, repairs lines 3 52 

George Hayes, repairs lines 90 

F E Wood, repairs lines 10 97 

X E T & T Co, repairs lines 21 41 

Jos A King, repairs lines 14 25 

A H Walton, repairs lines 19 75 

J J Merrill, repairs lines 34 62 

A D Mallard, repairs lines 26 84 

Orrin Leno, repairs lines 9 80 

Albert Sheppard, repairs lines 2 64 

Wm G Horton, repairs lines 2 18 

J W Goodhue, station supplies 10 75 

George Hayes, station supplies 5 00 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 21 



Paid to Amount 



Wetmore Savage Co, station supplies ] 1 55 

A G Osborne, oil & waste 784 20 

F E Wood, oil & waste 29 80 

C F Cnapman & Son, oil & waste 2 40 

E E Currier, auto supplies & repairs 72 90 

Mayer & Porter, auto supplies & repairs 159 74 

Hammett Street Garage, auto supplies & repairs 90 83 

A J Brennan, auto supplies & repairs 1 67 
Almy Bigelow Washburn, auto supplies & repairs 70 48 

Ipswich Mills, auto supplies & repairs 9 25 

R W Davis, auto supplies & repairs 23 68 

C J Dupray, auto supplies & repairs 3 00 

Wetmore Savage Co, auto supplies & repairs 215 04 

Jos A King, auto supplies & repairs 3 55 

Wilsons Garage, auto supplies & repairs 2 80 

W O Conant, auto supplies & repairs 7 50 

Mass Highway Com, auto supplies & repairs 2 00. 

J H Lakeman, postage 92 53 

NBT&TCo, telephone 34 96 

G A Schofield & Son, printing 123 00 

A C Damon, supplies 1 70 

Brown Howland, supplies 69 78 

Mun Lighting Asso, dues 10 00 

Hobbs Warren, supplies 33 30 

C S Garrette, supplies 3 03 

Peoples Express Co, supplies 37 

Treasurer Town of Ipswich, typewriter 35 00 

John Tupper, supplies 10 40 

Pettingell Andrews, supplies ■ 8 97 

Wetmore Savage Co, supplies 5 20 

C J Dupray, supplies 5 00 

F E Wood, teaming 3 23 

Miley Soap Co, supplies 24 50 

C S Tyler, supplies 9 73 

Geo E Marsh Co, supplies 15 07 

Com of Mass, assessment 16 59 

A H Walton, manager & clerk 650 00 



00 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Paid to 



Amount 



A A Jevrett, bookkeeper 
A H Walton, commissioner 
Win H Rand, commissioner 
Walter G Brown, commissioner 
' J IT \Y Hayes, commissioner 



324 00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


80 


55 


19 45 



$4876 87 



Note Payment 
.Votes paid by Treasurer 



$3550 00 



Interest 
Interest paid various parties by Treasurer 



$2284 00 



Jobbing Department 
C J Dupray, labor 
J H Sheppard, labor 
Wetmore Savage Co, supplies 
Pettingell Andrews Co, supplies 
American Express, express 
J J Merrill, supplies 



$ 


8 75 




9 42 




21 32 




10 31 




31 




25 83 



$75 94 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 23 

» - - - — ■ ' -■ — — — — — — - 

DR. MAINTENANCE CR. 

To bal Jan 1, 19194 5297 46 By bills paid 1919 $28008 73 

To sale of current 26238 74 Less old bills due 

To sale steam power 3000 00 Jan 1, 1919 116r; 62 

To insurance div 90 00 Coal on hand 21 37 00 

To miscellaneous 88 48 Bv bal in favor of 

To rent of poles due 200 80 Dept Jan 1, 1920 9665 68 

To amt due for light 4085 27 

To amt rec for coal 298 28 

To coal on hand 1676 00 



$40975 03 $40975 03 



DR. JOBBING DEPARTMENT CR, 



To bal profits to 

Jan 1, 1919 $3493 64 
To cash for labor 

& material 78 77 
To bills due 18- 31 


By bills paid 1919 $ 75 94 
By old bills due 

Jan 1, 1919 74 36 
By bal in favor of 

dept Jan 1, 1920 3440 42 


$3590 72 


$3590 72 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Treasurer's Statement* 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT. 


TOAVX OF IPSWICB 


WILLIAM J. RILEY, TREASURER 




DR. 






To amounts received: 






ial Light 


$20928 48 




Town Buildings 


872 96 




Jobbing 


11 54 




er 


5496 37 




Mi cellaneou* 


730 22 




■iation appropriation 


3150 00 




Xote appropriation 


3550 00 




Interest appropriation 


2284 00 




:e Street light appropriation 


1921 00 




Xote Issue 


6000 00 


$44944 57 


• 


i 


CR. 






By paid : 






Orders 


$37727 44 




Xotes 


3550 00 




Interest 


2284 00 




« 





$43561 44 



Balance, January 1919 $1383 13 

The Treasurer has the following bills for collection : 
Commercial Light $ 491 18 

Miscellaneous 18 31 

$509 49 



Commitment, Dec. 31, 1919 $3594 09 

Rent of poles 200 80 



3794 89 
$4304 38 



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26 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Managers Report* 



This year I would recommend the Town appropriate 
$10707.00 for street lights, the same amount paid per lamp 
as last year. From this amount will be charged interest, 
note and depreciation, the balance to be charged to manu- 
facturing account. 

The following tables show the number of services and 
also the amount of sales each year since the start. 



Year No. 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 





Sale of Current 


Services 


and Power 


69 


$ 3605 53 


105 


7076 77 


131 


8330 68 


170 


7462 43 


195 


9010 34 


218 


9178 64 


269 


10594 48 


323 


12159 42 


362 


14557 45 


435 


16131 80 


477 


17380 33 


521 


19559 41 


591 


19497 04 


652 


21975 77 


648 


23859 75 


700 


29238 74 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 27 



Our contract with the Town of Rowley expires July 
next, if the Town continues supplying them with their cur- 
rent and the load increases this year as it did last year the 
Town should take some action either to enlarge our plant 
or buy current. As we have nearly reached our maximum 
load for our large engine, whether we generate or buy I 
think the time has come when something should be done to 
increase our capacity. If the Town this year decides to 
make a change in their plant, the question of cost will come 
upon the taxpayer, which should be carefully considered. I 
believe the cost of buying current would be far less than 
to generate to receive the same results and I would recom- 
mend as I did last year to buy current, providing the price 
is right. 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, Manager. 



28 MUNICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



Commissioners' Report* 



To the Citizens of Ipswich : 

The Municipal Water and Light Commission submit 
their annual report for the year ending December 31, 1919. 

Water Department 
The expenditures for the year 1920 are estimated to be 
as follows : 

For Interest Payment $7831 00 

For Sinking Fund 4994 53 

For General Expenses 7000 00 

For Hvdrant Service 2237 50 



Total $22063 03 

The Board recommends that the amount for hydrant 
service be raised and appropriated from the tax levy, and 
the balance be taken from the earnings of the Water De- 
partment. 

Electric Light Department 
We would recommend the Town raise and appropriate 
for street lights the same amount per lamp as last year 
making 

786—40 watt lamps at $12.00 $9432 00 
17—300 watt lamps at 75.00 1275 00 



Total $10707 00 

From this amount wall be charged Interest $2442.00, 



MUNICIPAL LIGHT RE PORT 29 

note $4050.00 and depreciation $3300.00. 

We would recommend no appropriation be made to the 
Electric Light Department for the Town buildings, as the 
various departments include in their budgets recommenda- 
tions for the same. 

If the Town enters into another contract with the Town 
of Rowley which expires July next, and our load continues 
to grow as it has the last year, we believe the Town should 
take some action to enlarge our plant or buy current as our 
peak load has nearly reached the maximum of our large 
engine. 

We would recommend the Town take some action to in- 
crease our capacity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR H. WALTON, 
W. H. RAND. 



30 Ml'XICIPAL LIGHT REPORT 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books and 
accounts of the Water and Electric Light Department, and 
of the Treasurer of the Sinking Fund and find them cor- 
rect. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 
Ipswich, Jan. 26, 1920. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 




Town of Ipswich 



FOR THE YEAR 1919. 



Charles G. Hull, Printer: 

8 Cogswell Street, Ipswich, Mass. 

1920. 



#* "'"HI m ,„|llllllHI»l |IIIIIIK % ' 

V mi' 111 * " milium/ 



ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Chairman Herbert W. Mason 

Finance and Budget 

Herbert W. Mason and William J. Riley 

Text Books and Teachers 

Herbert W. Mason and Dr\ G. E. MacArthur 

Supplies, Buildings and Grounds 

Luther Wait and Charles H. Galligan 



School Physician Dr. George E. MacArthur 

School Nurse Martha J. Stewart 



Attendance Officer George W. Tozer 

Clerk of the Board George W. Tozer 



Superintendent and Purchasing Agent 

Joseph I. Horton 

Office Manning School Building 

Office Hours School Days from 3.30 to 5.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Expenditures. 



Appropriation for 1919 
Balance from 1918 

General Expenses 
Salaries: 

Day Schools 

Evening School 
Text Books and Supplies 
Transportation 
Janitors' Service 
*Fuel and Light 
Building and Grounds 
Furniture and Furnishings 
Insurance 

Diplomas and Graduating Exercises 
Tuition 
Miscellaneous 

Unpaid Bills 

Delayed Bills 

Unexpended Balance 



$ 4081 65 

30426 15 

508 00 

4696 50 

2360 32 

2660 99 

1781 44 

1475 01 

124 20 

274 00 

74 05 

75 60 
86 53 
88 23 

551 78 
176 73 



$49000 00 
441 18 



$49441 18 $49441 18 



*The item for fuel should be increased by $566.53, as the 
balance of the coal order was not delivered until January 6th, 
1920. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of the Town of Ipswich: — 

In submitting its annual 
report the School Committee desires to express its appreciation 
of the fact that our schools have been enabled to continue their 
work throughout the year with little or no interruption. There 
have been, of course, some minor hindrances to steady progress, 
but on the whole the year has been exceptionally free from 
epidemics and those other misfortunes that work so disastrously 
against the maintenance of up-to-date standards of scholar- 
ship. 

We have been fortunate, too, in retaining the services of 
most of our teachers throughout the entire year. Fewer changes 
have been made thus far this year than for sometime past. 
This has been a distinct advantage to our schools and was se- 
cured only by increasing salaries to the level of those paid 
in other places of the same population and wealth. And this, 
we feel, must become the settled policy of the Town if we are 
to retain our best teachers. 

The call to service withdrew a large number of our male 
teachers who will not return to educational fields until the com- 
pensation for teaching is more nearly on a parity with that 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



received from industrial lines. The same is also true of wom- 
en teachers who, for the time being, have left the calling for 
other kinds of work that are more remunerative. 

But whether any of these ever return to the profession of 
teaching or not, it is only fair and just to the faithful few that 
our appreciation of their loyalty be shown by sufficient salaries 
to enable them not only to meet the higher cost of living, but 
also to maintain respect for their calling and to save something 
for old age. 

This is not a matter of sentiment. It is a simple economic 
problem of supply and demand, and at present the demand 
vastly exceeds the supply. 

We trust that the citizens of our town will concur in this 
view of the situation and grant us the increase for salaries as 
apportioned in our budget. 

We wish to call your attention to that part of the special 
report dealing with the physical condition of our school chil- 
dren. This is certainly a bad showing and should arouse us to 
some action tending to a decided and permanent improve- 
ment. Physical exercise is doing something along this line, but it 
cannot do everything. The daily program of the lives of our 
school children needs to be revised at once. Parents should 
give careful and intelligent consideration to this matter if they 
wish their boys and girls to develop into strong and sturdy men 
and women, of a type able to render efficient service and to en- 
dure the strain of present-day requirements. 

Your Committee is in full accord with the Superintendent 
in reference to the exploitation of our school children. This 
matter has been carried too far for the intellectual, physical and 
moral well-being of our pupils, and we hope to see a reason- 
able curtailment in those activities which depend too much for 
their successful accomplishment upon the pupils of our schools. 

The sanitary arrangements at the Payne and Cogswell 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Schools still remain in their out-of-date and primitive condition. 
It is unnecessary to repeat any arguments as to the desirability 
of making changes here. The cost of material and of labor has 
been prohibitive, and we have not recently urged the settlement 
of this question so much as its real importance demands. 
But as prices are in a fair way to remain at this level for 
some time to come and complaints have been frequent, we feel 
the necessity of putting the proposition squarely before you. 
We therefore ask for a special appropriation of two thousand 
($2000.) dollars that the toilet arrangements of these schools 
may be put into sanitary and reasonably modern condition. 

We renew our recommendations of last year in reference 
to straightening the back line of the Manning and Winthrop 
School grounds and if possible to secure a right of way to Man- 
ning Street. 

The Superintendent's report will contain abstracts from two 
very important school laws passed by our Legislature during 
the session of 1918 and 1919. One of those has reference to 
the amount of money returned by the State to the Town each 
year on condition that teachers' salaries be raised to certain 
specified limits fixed by law. The other compels the establish- 
ment of special school privileges for delinquents. 

As both these laws have a direct and special bearing upon 
school appropriations you are most strongly urged to give them 
your careful consideration. 

We are much pleased to note that more and more of our 
,High School pupils are contemplating going to college each 
succeeding year. This would seem to indicate a growing 

thoughtfulness on the part of our pupils in reference to their life 
work and a determination to lay a good foundation for usefulness 
later on. We cannot too strongly urge this matter to the attention of 
more of our pupils. Such a course not only brings advantages 
to the students themselves, but it adds very materially to the 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



good name of the school and of the town. A well-trained mind 
and a sound body, added to frugal and industrious habits, are 
a sufficient guaranty for a useful and successful life. 

Your Committee desires to make our schools of the largest 
possible advantage to all concerned, but we wish to impress 
most forcibly upon the minds of our youth that education alone 
is not sufficient. It must be accompanied by the spirit of per- 
sonal effort and endeavor, by an enlightened vision and a sin- 
cere desire to supply world needs. Then our schools will be 
fulfilling their mission and be giving to the community just 
what every tax-payer has a right to expect and demand — a good 
citizen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT W. MASON, Chairman 
HOWARD N. DOUGHTY 
LUTHER WAIT 
DR. GEORGE E. MACARTHUR 
CHARLES H. GALLIGAN 
WILLIAM J. RILEY 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of the Town of Ipswich, Mass., 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith submit for your consideration the 
following report of the condition of the schools under your 
charge, together with such recommendations as in my judgment 
are most necessary for their further progress and usefulness. 
This is the eighteenth report from the office of the School Su- 
perintendent of the town and the fourth of my incumbency. 
Did time and space permit, it might be profitable to make some 
extended review of conditions as they were at the beginning of 
this period, and as they are today. Suffice it to say that our 
school population has shown a steady increase during this time 
and is today more than ten per cent, above what it was four 
years ago. 

On the whole, our teachers have shown a commendable 
zeal; and, notwithstanding the many annoyances and interfer- 
ence by outside agencies, our schools have maintained a steady 
advance. That there have been no epidemics nor long periods 
of sickness in which a considerable number of pupils was in- 
volved, must be considered as extremely fortunate; and had it 
not been for the large number of truancy cases, our percentage 
of attendance would have made a very satisfactory showing. As 



10 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



it is, our attendance compares favorably with that of previous 
years, but it might have been better. 

Since the beginning of the year, special emphasis has been 
placed upon the subject of reading in the lower grades. The 
results are most gratifying. The teachers of the grades have 
visited the best schools in Boston, Lynn, Salem, Beverly, and 
Lawrence, for the purpose of observing the methods and prac- 
tices of the very best special teachers in this line of work. We 
cannot speak too highly of the assistance given our teachers by 
Miss Niland of the Hancock School of Boston, Miss Kenneally 
of the Upham School of Salem, and Miss Churchill of the Oliver 
School of Lawrence. These teachers have obtamed astonishing 
results with their pupils; and, for the honor of their noble cal- 
ling, let me say that they have been as generous and open- 
handed with their advice and timely suggestions as one could 
even wish. 

Our own teachers have imbibed not a little of the enthu- 
siasm and earnestness of purpose so evident in those schools, 
and the results obtained here in our own schools have been 
most encouraging to both teacher and pupil alike. The amount 
of reading that will be accomplished in the primary grades this 
year will be double, and in some cases treble, that of former 
years. 

When we consider that a great many of these little folks 
knew absolutely nothing of English when they entered school 
in September and that they have already completed their third 
and fourth elementary readers, we may well say that these pri- 
mary schools are the crown and glory of our common school 
system. They are the greatest good to the largest num- 

ber, the foundation upon which all after work is to be built- 
Failure here means failure all along the line; success here, if per- 
sistently followed, assures a splendid superstructure, of which 
the whole world may well be proud. I have always contended 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 11 



that these schools are of the utmost importance and should have 
the best teachers, and observation and experience would seem 
to bear me out in the contention. 

I have persistently urged our teachers to pay closer atten- 
tion to the position of the pupils while the latter are engaged in 
all kinds of written work. The supervised drill of the writing 
lesson is not sufficient to carry over and hold the pupil to the 
correct position in other written exercises. In other words, the 
drill in movement and position is not sustained long enough in 
the writing lesson to insure correct position and movement in 
the written work of arithmetic or language, for instance. The 
closest attention and the most exacting supervision must be 
continued from one exercise to another, from day to day, and 
from grade to grade, until correct position and movement have 
crystallized into established habit. This system is followed by 
some of our teachers with most gratifying results, and their pu- 
pils have been awarded certificates of penmanship. But there 
should be more teachers and more pupils doing this same kind 
of honest work. Lack of progress and actual deterioration are 
too much in evidence; and I shall offer, under the heading of 
salaries, some few suggestions which I hope may tend to im- 
provement. A good handwriting is too valuable an asset to be 
overlooked in our schools, and we must make all reasonable ef- 
forts to secure the same for each and all of our pupils. 

Oral composition has been receiving an increasing share of 
attention in our schools during the past year. Instead of requir- 
ing the pupil to write about some subject with which perhaps 
he is not very familiar, we simply ask him to tell about his own 
experiences in his own way. He thus acquires the habit of cor- 
rect expression by using his mother tongue. Instead of memor- 
izing correct forms of expression, he habituates them. The cor- 
rections by the teacher apply to all his recitations, and thus his 
language lesson becomes a continnous performance, with ob- 



12 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



vious benefits to the whole class. This method begets a desire 
to excel, gives confidence, develops courtesy and leadership, and 
will ultimately make of our boys and girls more forceful and 
useful citizens. The work in this branch of our endeavor has 
been highly satisfactory in most of the rooms. 

Music played an important part in the war; and even after 
its close our school children were requisitioned for so many pa- 
geants and drives and celebrations that a good part of their 
time was necessarily devoted to singing the popular music of 
the day. And their work was well done, as many who heard 
them can testify. 

With the return of peace, our musical director has, during 
the past year, devoted more of his energies to musical notation 
and part singing in the grades and has, at the same time, brought 
out a fine chorus from the student body of our high school. 

I am pleased to note the interest in chorus work of an in- 
creasing number of our high school boys — an indisputable evi- 
dence of a growing music appreciation in our schools — the end 
and aim of all musical instruction. 

An operatic performance is shortly to be given by our High 
School Chorus, and we predict that all who attend will be 
pleased and gratified with the results of our work in music. 

For a further statement of plan and progress of this work, 
you are referred to the report of the supervisor to be found on 
another page of this report. 

A cabinet of stereopticon slides has been added to our 
equipment. These are to be used by all the schools as an 
effective supplement to the work of the teachers, and to visual- 
ize and drive home the instruction gained from the text book. 
It is said that seven-eighths of all our information comes through 
the gate of the eye, and we feel assured that both the quantity 
and the quality of our instruction will be greatly increased by 
this acquisition. But its scope will not be confined to the rou- 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 13 



tine work of the schools. It can be used to illustrate topics of 
local and national interest and to assist very materially in mak- 
ing our schools important community centers, where all can 
learn with least effort what is being done in the world about 
them. 

Best of all, by its compelling interest it will secure the co- 
operation of the pupils themselves. In connection with our 
oral language work, the pupils will take a new interest and a 
greater pride in their work, as all will wish and will be required 
to have a part in these illustrated "lectures" or "talks." 

A beginning has just been made in this line of work; but 
the results, meager though they may be, fully justify our predic- 
tions, We regret that the Burley School lacks the necessary 
electrical connections to allow the use of the lantern in that im- 
portant group of schools. This can be remedied, we under- 
stand, at a very small expense. If so, it should be done at 
once. 

Last July Miss Blaisdell, the former drawing teacher, left us 
to accept a position in the Newburyport High School. Her 

work there is confined entirely to the High School. It is her 
home town, and the salary is larger than we have been paying 
in Ipswich. Against such powerful factors there was but one 
course to follow, viz: surrender — gracefully, if possible — but 
surrender. Miss Blaisdell was an excellent teacher. She knew 
her subject thoroughly, had a plan in her work and she followed 
it with a fidelity and persistence that was unusual. She was a 
good disciplinarian. The pupils knew what was expected of 
them, and it was generally ready for delivery upon demand. 
She got more work and better work from the schools individ- 
ually and as a whole than any of her predecessors have been 
able to obtain. The work in drawing attracted a large share of 
attention at the School Exhibition last June. We were indeed 



14 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



very sorry to lose Miss Blaisdell, for we felt that our schools 
sustained a great loss by her going. 

On the suggestion of Mr. McCann, the union superintend- 
ent of Georgetown and Rowley, we were induced to interview 
Miss Anna Nason who was doing good work in the schools un- 
der his jurisdiction, and she was persuaded to come to us on a 
part time basis. Miss Nason is with us the first three days of 
each week and is doing excellent work. She has endeared 

herself to teachers and pupils alike, and the harmonious rela- 
tions existing between them and every phase of school work is 
most gratifying. We esteem ourselves as fortunate in securing 
the services and the personality of so worthy a successor to 
Miss Blaisdell, and bespeak for her a year, at least, full of 
good works. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 

John Ruskin's advice to girls, sound and sensible at all 
times, should appeal to us with a new force and suggestiveness 
in these times of excessive prices. Let me quote a few lines as 
an introduction to a report on our Domestic Science Depart- 
ment: 

"Resolve to do every day some work that is useful. Learn 
first the economy of the kitchen: the good and the bad quality 
of every common article of food and the simplest and best 
mode of its preparation. When you have time, help in cooking 
and learn how to make everything as nice as possible. Learn 
the sound qualities of all useful stuffs, and make everything of 
the best you can get. Every day, some little piece of useful 

clothing sew with your own fingers as strongly as it can be 
stitched, and embroider it or otherwise beautify it moderately 
with fine needlework, such as^a girl may be proud of having 
done." 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 15 



I hope to see the day when every girl will be compelled 
by law to take this course. The supervisor's report may be 

found farther on in this report. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

We are extremely fortunate in retaining Mr. Arthur W. 
Gould as supervisor of Manual Training. He is a skilled me- 
chanic; economical in the use of material; works on a well- 
thought-out plan; willing to work for and with his pupils in sea- 
son and out; a good disciplinarian; absolutely fair in his treat- 
ment of special cases; and, best of all, exacts from every boy 
the full amount of work, well done, that is assigned to him day 
by day. 

There is no loafing in this department. Every boy is re- 

quired to do his best, and every completed article or piece of 
work bears evidence to the painstaking care given to that work. 
The boys are taught not only the uses cf the different tools, but 
they are taught how to use them and to use them properly. 
Most of the pupils enjoy the work and take special pride in 
their efforts. I consider our pupils unusually fortunate in the 
opportunities which this department affords. 

PERCENTAGE OF UNDER-WEIGHT PUPILS IN 
VARIOUS SCHOOLS. 

Last December I requested the school nurse to give me a 
percentage list of the under-weight pupils in each of our schools. 
The following list is just as it came from her hand; and, 1 must 
confess, that the showing staggered me. I make no comment. 
The figures are eloquent enough to tell their own story, and 
they should be significant enough to demand our most serious 
consideration. 



16 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



An account of the work of the school nurse will be found 
in another part of this report. 

PERCENTAGE OF UNDER-WEIGHTS LISTED BY 

SCHOOLS. 



High School. 

Freshman 33.9 per cent. Juniors 

Sophomores 30.77 per cent. Seniors 



22.33 per cent. 
39. 1 2 per cent. 



Winthrop School. 



Grade VIII,, 


Class 4 


«» <« 


« 3 


" VII., 


44 2 
" i 


VI, 


i 
Miss Anderson 


«« «( 


Mrs. Fisher 


V. 


Miss Willcomb 


«• «< 


Miss Ladd 


" IV, 


Miss Bell 




Burley Scho< 


Grade V., 


38.46 per cent. Grade 


" IV, 


22.50 " " 




Portable School 


Grade I., 


Miss Archer 


" L. 


Miss Stanford 




Payne School. 


Grade II 


L, Miss Bowlen 


" I. and 11 


., Miss Trussell 



III., 
II.. 



59. per cent. 

52. 

55.55 

40.54 

39.13 

36.58 

50. 

39.53 

36.58 



34.2 1 per cent 
46.51 " " 



41.18 per cent. 
42.86 " M 



26.47 per cent. 
41.30 " " 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 17 



Dennison School. 

Grade III., Miss Wade 36.1 1 per cent. 

II., Miss Kimball 56.25 " " 

I., " " 43.75 " " 

Cogswell School. 

Grade II., 37.1 3 per cent. Grade I., 4 1 .66 per cent. 

Wainwright School. 

Grade II., 41.18 per cent. Grade I., 38.46 per cent. 

Candlewood School. 
Grades I. to VI., 1 7.65 per cent. 

Linebrook School. 

Grades I. to VI., 5.26 per cent. 

Whole number examined, 962. Average per cent, of un- 
der-weight pupils, 38.14 per cent. 

The rural schools make the best showing. The Linebrook 
School had but one pupil that was under-weight. 

SCHOOL EXHIBITION. 

The annual exhibition of school work was held as usual 
and the consensus of opinion is that, in respect to the quantity 
and quality of the work displayed, it superseded all previous 
exhibitions. The afternoon was devoted to viewing the samples 
of work from the various schools, aud the physical exercises and 
folk dances by the pupils of the first eight grades. In the eve- 
ning a new feature was introduced, which proved of special in- 
terest to those present. "Government Ownership of the Rail- 
roads" furnished the subject of a debate given by pupils 



18 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



from the High School. The whole exercise was carried out in 
a highly creditable manner and gave evidence of the careful 
preparation made by the contestants. The attendance here, al- 
so, shows a growing interest of the parents in the work of their 
children. 



FIELD DAY. 

For the first time in the history of the Ipswich Schools, 
Field Day exercises were held on the School Playgrounds, the 
1 8th day of last June, from 2 to 4 p.m., and drew a large attend- 
ance. This was simply an exhibition of the work in physical 
training attempted daily in all our schools, and gave those who 
witnessed the events a clearer idea of the educational value of 
such training. The exercises consisted of competitive relay 
races, setting up drills, folk dances, etc., etc. Some of our busi- 
ness men acted as judges, and prizes were awarded for the 
performance of both individuals and groups. 

Not the least of its advantages is the fact that it brought to- 
gether a far greater number of the friends of the schools than 
could be assembled by any other educational device. It gave 
them an opportunity to form a correct judgment of the kind of 
discipline we are trying to maintain in our schools, and to form 
for themselves some mental estimate of the work and worth of 
each teacher as evidenced by the work of the individual clas- 
ses. 

The expense of putting the grounds into condition, paying 
for the services of the band, etc., was almost wholly met by the 
receipts from the sale of cake, candy and ice cream. To Mrs. 
Harry K. Damon and Mrs. M. C. McGinley, who had full charge 
of this part of the program, and to their corps of able assistants, 
our thanks are especially due. Upon their energy and good 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 19 



business sense the success of the enterprise depended in largest 
measure. 

RURAL SCHOOLS. 

There has been but one change in teachers of these schools 
this year. Miss Archer was transferred from the Linebrook 

School to the first grade in the Portable School, and Miss Ruth 
Joyce was placed in charge at Linebrook. Miss Cunningham 
and Miss Jewett retain their old position at Candlewood and 
Grape Island. 

The same activities have been carried on in these schools 
as in preceding years. They have the privilege of the Public 
Library, and are visited regularly by the different supervisors. 
With the exception of the Manual Training, they enjoy all the 
advantages of the larger schools in the central part of the 
town. 

With the same type of instruction and supervision, I see no 
reason why the work of these schools should not compare fa- 
vorably with that of the graded schools. As a matter of fact, 
these schools do as well or better. The attendance is fully as 
good; the conditions of child growth much more favorable; the 
distractions from real school work fewer by far. 

The rural schools outside the State are coming into their 
own again and are receiving more consideration from school 
authorities. This we believe to be a step in the right direction, 
all things considered; and we would not hesitate to recommend 
the establishment of two more within our borders were the 
school population in these districts a little larger. 

NIGHT SCHOOL. 

The night school has been continued as usual with dimin- 



20 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



ishing numbers each succeeding year. Every inducement is 

offered to the young people of the town to improve these edu- 
cational opportunities, but the response has been somewhat 
disappointing. 

We have used every advertising device with which we are 
familiar, and have supplemented these with the direct personal 
appeal, but all to no effect. It would seem that our young peo- 
ple are absolutely indifferent to such appeals; that they lack 
vision as well as appreciation, and have no desire to improve 
their present condition nor to advance themselves to a higher 
intellectual and social plane. The conclusion is forced upon 
us, repugnant as it may seem to all right-minded people, that 
where the element of legal compulsion is lacking, favorable re- 
sults are not to be expected in night school attendance. There 
have been, and still are, some few exceptions to this general 
rule, but the native born furnish no part of these exceptions. 

There are on file in this office something over six hundred 
labor certificates issued within the last few years. Over half of 
these are for children between fourteen and sixteen years of 
age. Under the old law, if a pupil had completed the work of 
the fourth grade he could demand a certificate when he became 
fourteen years of age, and it is in this class that too many of 
these applicants are to be found. The new law requires the 

completion of the work of the sixth grade which will be a dis- 
tinct advantage; but even then these boys and girls need far 
more educational training before they can have any adequate 
knowledge of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship. 

Night school or continuation school attendance should be 
required by law of all pupils who leave school before the senior 
year in the high school; and then, perhaps, we might say that 
our schools had made America safe for democracy. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 21 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Repairs during the past year or two have been limited to 
such work as was actually necessary to prevent damage or loss. 
Material in many instances could not be obtained at any price. 
Stock ordered last September has not been received at this 
writing. 

This policy has forced upon us a large amount of necessary 
work which cannot longer be postponed. Desks must be resur- 
faced, walls and ceilings in many of the rooms must be tinted, 
and the floors of the Manning Building need to be relaid in 
order to save unnecessary expense later on. The trimmings of 
the Burley School should be painted during the coming sum- 
mer, and the Portable School should be put in thorough re- 
pair. 

Frequent complaints as to the unsanitary arrangements of 
the Payne and Cogswell Schools have been made this year, and 
we are of the opinion that this matter should have our imme- 
diate attention if the town wishes to avoid expensive legal pro- 
ceedings. 

The line-fence running parallel to Manning Street has fallen 
still further into decay and must be replaced by a new fence as 
soon as men and material can be had at a reasonable price. 
The grading of the grounds at the rear of the school buildings 
on Central Street has not been completed as yet, and a few 
more shrubs are needed in the central plot before this project 
can be considered as finished. But these last can give place to 
others that are more pressing, and which for strictly economical 
reasons must receive prompt attention. 

In this connection, it might be said that many of the black- 
boards in the Manning School are hardly usable. Pupils can- 
not do good work upon such broken surfaces. These should be 
replaced by slate as soon as possible. 



22 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



SALARIES. 

From the viewpoint of a Superintendent, the question of 
salaries looms big and black on his horizon at the present time. 
He fully realizes, on the one hand, that in the transition period 
from an occupation to a profession teaching, or the calling itself, 
has received but partial and tardy recognition, and the teacher 
has been overlooked and too long neglected. Her claims are 

just and should be generously met. 

But, on the other handj he must sfncerely regret the evi- 
dent tendency to the employment of propaganda and industrial 
methods to secure an end which at best can be but temporary. 
If the great body of school teachers wish to adopt the devices 
of unskilled laborers, then they must accept that classification. 
But let it be remembered that it was self-imposed and will in 
the end defeat the attainment of that purpose for which so 
many of our best educators haye struggled so long. Action and 
re-action are equal. If teachers wish their salaries to be gov- 
erned by the economic law of supply and demand, and to fluc- 
tuate between the same wide extremes as labor and general com- 
modities, then these propagandists are pursuing the right course. 

But if they wish to secure for themselves a sure, foundation 
for professional advancement; one that is not to be disturbed by 
industrial conditions, nor shaken by political prejudices, then 
let such foundations be laid in the confident esteem of the com- 
mon people, and salaries will take care of themselves. 

A few words from Dr. E. S. Evenden, who spent eight 
months in collecting and "organizing material for his report, may 
not be out of place here. This is what he says: 

"Teachers must insist upon, adequate pay in order that the 
work of education may meet its present-day obligations, but it 
is no longer necessary to wage campaigns for increased salaries 
solely upon the basis of sentiment or justice to an oppressed 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 23 



class. The case can be presented on its merits, and where cam- 
paigns have been vigorously made on the principle of educa- 
ting the community on matters concerning the school to the 
point that they are able to recognize needs, they have, almost 
always been successful." 

By this method the teacher secures the end sought, estab- 
lishes herself in the community, and sets an example which 
others would do well to follow. 

It gives me no small degree of gratification to say that, with 
a single exception, our salary adjustments have been made with 
the individual. teachers, and I hope to their satisfaction. 

Of course, it is understood that any further increase of sal- 
ary is conditional upon the exceptionally good work of the indi- 
vidual teacher. Effort and results should be the controlling 
factor here as everywhere. The teacher who is doing poor 

work in any subject— as writing, for instance — is not entitled to 
consideration except for a reduction of both rank and salary. 
The merit system is the logical one that should maintain here, 
if we wish to be fair to teachers, pupils, and taxpayers. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

Most of the changes recommended last year were held in 
abeyance, as both labor and material were not obtainable. 
These should be taken up as soon as conditions will permit, but no 
extraordinary expenditures should be undertaken at present. Only 
the most pressing, those that are forced upon us by necessity 
and by law, are to be considered at the present level cf prices. 

The law going into effect next September in reference to 
special instruction for delinquent children will necessitate the 
employment of an extra teacher for this class of pupils, and we 
recommend another teacher for the backward pupils, of the 



24 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Winthrop School, as that school is overcrowded at the present 
time. 

PENNY SAVINGS. 

There has been a little falling off in the receipts from pen- 
ny savings this year especially in the upper grades, which I hope 
may be due simply to a temporary lack of enthusiasm. This is too 
important a part of child training to be overlooked or neglected, 
and we hope the parents will do all in their power to encourage 
thrift. Not what we earn but what we save, gives us the found- 
ation upon which to build. , 

The method of collection has been the same as in former 
years. Mr. Tozer visits each room once a week and receives 
from the teacher such sums as she has collected from the pupils. 
Where the amount from a pupil is sufficient to buy a thrift stamp 
or a war savings stamp, the pupil buys the stamp or stamps di- 
rect from Mr. Tozer. When the individual prepares to take 
out a new Savings Bank book or to make additions to one al- 
ready in his possession, Mr. Tozer attends to the business for 
the pupil. 

Value of thrift stamps sold 
Value of war stamps sold 

Total 
Number of New Bank books opened 

This does not represent the total of savings by any means. 
Many of the pupils have purchased both thrift and war savings 
stamps from other sources, and of these we have no account. 
Of course no account of the money deposited on old books is 
attempted, as it would involve too much book-keeping. 

Miss Annie P. Wade's school leads all other schools in the 
amount of money saved during the year. 



$ 221.00 
1940.00 


$2161.00 

■ 37 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 25 



GENERAL. 

I wish to call the attention of both parents and teachers to 
a few things that militate decidedly against the best interests of 
our schools. And first among them is the exploitation of our 
school children by those well-meaning persons who do not stop 
to consider the limits of child endurance. After every drive or 
fair or other entertainment, the fatigue of 'the children is very 
noticeable. Teachers complain that their children are inatten- 
tive and give every indication of loss of sleep. Futhermore, it 
would seem that everybody was trying to foist his pet project — 
for which he is fully compensated — upon the school. This is 

unfair to the teacher as well as to the child, and should not be 
tolerated by the parents. 

Unless these outside attractions are kept within reasonable 
bounds, the progress of such pupils will be impeded to such an 
extent that they will drop back in their grade and the work will 
have to be repeated. If the schools could be left severely alone 
and allowed to resume and continue their proper and legitimate 
work, results would be more satisfactory and there would be 
less cause for criticism. As it is at present, even the three R's 
are in danger of being crowded out. A little more co-operation 
between the parent and the teacher would help amazingly in 
this matter, with a resulting gain in both health and scholarship, 
and would tend to diminish that intermeddling by outside in- 
terests. 

We are receiving not a few complaints in reference to after- 
school work. Let me say right here that if a pupil is required 
to remain after school to make up work, it is proof positive that 
he was not attentive in class or failed to prepare his lesson at 
the proper time. In either case there is but one alternative; He 
must make up his work after school or drop back into the grade 
below. A little pressure brought to bear right here, often es- 



26 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



tablishes correct habits and saves a boy for larger usefulness. 
We are continually striving to have the pupil abandon his plan- 
ning to "get by" and to get the viewpoint of honest work. And 
this idea cannot be too strongly enforced. The academic ac- 
quirements which the pupil gets from the school will be of little 
value either to himself or to society unless he puts this know- 
ledge to some practical use. In fact, he must be made to realize 
that the real function of the school is to furnish him with an 
equipment for his life work; that the more of it he gets the more 
useful he may become, and the greater his chances of success. 

But along with this he should be impressed with the nobil- 
ity of labor — real, honest, hard work. Parents wish their child- 
ren to succeed in the world but are they equally as willing that 
their children should work hard for success? The two things 
must go together or the larger success can never come to them. 

It is often said that education tends to laziness and inclines 
its possessor to despise work. If this indictment is true then we 
are working upon a false basis and our curricula need revision. 
But it is not true. Education alone will not make a man either 
good or great; but it can help him to become both. Let our 
pupils understand that there is no "royal road" to an education, 
that it means work, and that its value depends upon its use, and 
they will have the right point of view. The worlds greatest 
and most successful men have been the greatest workers and 
the greatest seekers after knowledge, and let these be the ex- 
amples for our sons and daughters to follow. 

Some one has said: 

"Life's master word is work. With this magic word in one's 
heart, all things are possible. It is the touch-stone of progress, 
and the key to success." 

My reasons for emphasizing this feature of school life so 
strongly is the fact that we have nearly a score of young people 
started for college and we are desirous that they should perse- 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 27 



vere to the end. Any distraction at this stage of their progress 
would result disastrously to their prospects, and turn them from 
their purpose — something we wish to prevent if possible. If but 
half of this number succeed in securing a college diploma it will 
be the greatest honor that has come to our school for some time. 
Not a few of our pupils are pursuing their studies in higher in- 
stitutions of learning at the present time and this fact is exerting 
no small influence upon our present student body. Let us strive 
in every way to impress upon all our pupils that knowledge and 
labor beget wisdom, and that true happiness is the offspring 
of service. 

In order that the citizens of our town may have a clearer 
conception of the legal requirements that compel an increased 
school appropriation, we are inserting an abstract of such laws 
as have a direct bearing upon the matter: 



GENERAL ACT. 

[Chap. 363.] 

An Act to Provide for the Distribution of a Portion of the In- 
come Tax, and of the Income of the Massachusetts School 
Fund, for the purpose of Improving the Public Schools. 

<7}e it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Part I. 

Section 1 . The treasurer and receiver general shall, on or 
before the fifteenth day of November, nineteen hundred and 
nineteen, and annually thereafter, set aside from the proceeds of 
the income tax a sum of money sufficient to provide for the pur- 
poses of Part I of this act, and which shall be available therefor 
without further appropriation by the general court. 



28 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Section 2. The treasurer and receiver general shall, as 
herein provided, distribute said sum on or before the fifteenth 
day of November, nineteen hundred and nineteen and annually 
thereafter, to the several cities and towns of the commonwealth 
as reimbursement, in part, for expenditures for salaries of 
teachers, supervisors, principals, assistant superintendents, and 
superintendents of schools, for services rendered in the public 
day schools during the year ending on the thirtieth day of June 
next preceding. 

Section 3. For each person employed for full-time service 
for the entire school year as teacher, supervisor, principal, as- 
sistant superintendent, or superintendent of schools, the city or 
town shall be reimbursed as follows: — 

(1) Two hundred dollars for every such person who has 
received as salary not less than eight hundred and fifty dollars 
and who is a graduate of an approved normal school or college 
and has had at least two years teaching experience or who pos- 
sesses preparation and teaching experience accepted in lieu 
thereof. 

(2) One hundred and fifty dollars for every such person, 
not included in the foregoing classification, who has received as 
salary not less than seven hundred and fifty dollars and (a) who 
has satisfactorily completed one year of professional training in 
an approved normal school or teachers* training school, and has 
had at least three years of teaching experience; or (b) is a grad- 
uate of an approved normal school or college, and has had at 
least one year of teaching experience; or (c) who possesses prep- 
aration and teaching experience accepted in lieu of either of the 
foregoing requirements in this paragraph. 

(3) One hundred dollars for every such person, not includ- 
ed in either paragraphs (1) or (2), who has received as salary 
not less than six hundred and fifty dollars. 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 29 



Section 4. For each teacher, supervisor, principal, assist- 
ant superintendent, or superintendent of schools, employed for 
less than full-time service for the school year, the city or town 
shall be reimbursed such a fractional part of the corresponding 
reimbursement for full-time service provided for in section three 
of this act as that service bore to full-time service: provided, 
however, that the person for whom the reimbursement is 
claimed shall have met the corresponding requirements of cer- 
tification, if any, specified in section three, and shall have re- 
ceived as salary an amount not less than that fraction of the 
corresponding salary for full-time service specified in section 
three. 

Section 8. The superintendent^ schools shall, under oath, 
file with the commissioner of education, not later than the first 
day of August, nineteen hundred and twenty, and of each year 
thereafter, a statement containing such data as may be neces- 
sary for the purposes of Part I of this act, upon blanks prepared 
by the commissioner. Before filing the said statement the su- 

perintendent of schools shall submit it to the chairman of the 
school committee for examination and counter signature under 
oath. The commissioner of education shall cause the said state- 
ments to be examined and shall transmit them to the treasurer 
and receiver general, together with a tabulation showing the 
amount due to each city and town. 



30 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



GENERAL ACT. 

[Chap. 277.] 

An Act to Determine the Number of Children Retarded in Men- 
tal Development and to Provide for Their Instruction. 

{7}e it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . The school committee of each city and town 
shall, within one year after the passage of this act, and annually 
thereafter, ascertain, under regulations prescribed by the board 
of education and the director of the commission on mental dis- 
eases, the number of children three years or more retarded in 
mental development who are in attendance upon the public 
schools of its city or town, or who are of school age and reside 
therein. 

Section 2. At the beginning of the school year of nineteen 
hundred and twenty, the school committee of each city and 
town in which there are ten or more children three years or 
more so retarded shall establish special classes to give such 
children instruction adapted to their mental attainments, under 
regulations prescribed by the board of education. ] Approved 
July 1, 1919. 



iPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



31 



BUDGET. 

Just what sum will be needed to meet our financial require- 
ment this year is extremely uncertain. We feel that the peak 
or prices has been reached, but the trend is still upwards; and 
when this movement will stop, no one can tell. So we wish it 
to be understood that, in submitting these figures, you are to 
consider them as tentative rather than as fixed and absolute, 
though they have been calculated upon the basis of the best 
judgment of the School Board. 



Budget. 



General Expense 

Teachers' Salaries 

Text Books and Supplies 

Tuition - 

Transportation 

Janitor Service 

Fuel and Light 

Buildings and Grounds 

Furniture and Furnishings 

Diplomas 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous 



$ 



4125. 

40500. 

4100. 

216. 
2900. 
3100. 
4250. 
3500. 

400. 
50. 

300. 

200. 



$6364 



The above footing represents the gross amount asked for at 
the present time, and is to be red uced by the amount of return- 
items of revenue from the sources indicated on the following 
page. This, also, is an estimate; but, based on the data at hand 



32 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



at the present time, it is approximately correct. 



Returns. 



From the State: 



On salaries of 26 teac 


.hers at $200. 


$5200. 




In (( «< <2 


11 150. 


450. 




«• " " 4 


" 100. 


400. 




'< H t( '-y 


(part time) 


200. 




Minor State Wards 




200. 




Grape Island 




160. 




Tuition, Beverly Industrial School 


216. 








$6826. 


$6826. 


Town of Rowley: 








Tuition of Pupils 




$2400. 


$2400. 


Total 






$9226. 



Considering these totals as fairly representing our require- 
ment, the account stands thus: 



Gross 
Receipts 

Net 



$63641. 
9226. 

$54415 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



We wish to make acknowledgment of the various gifts and 
donations received by the schools during the year. First among 
these are two valuable pictures from Mrs. F. B. Harrington 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 33 



of Argilla Road. The larger of these has been hung in the low- 
er corridor and the other in one of the smaller recitation rooms, 
where they add very much to the attractiveness of these posi- 
tions. A few other gifts have been received with the request that 
the names of the donors be withheld. 

We wish to express our gratitude to Prof, and Mrs. Bailey; 
to Mrs. Harland Burke and the Misses Bailey and Stanford and 
all others who by their punctual attendance upon the Commun- 
ity Chorus rehearsals assured the success of these gatherings. 
Especially are our thanks due to Mrs. H. K. Damon and Mrs. 
M. C. McGinley and their corps of able assistants for their splen- 
did work in connection with our Field Day exercises. 

Our thanks are due also to the Chief of Police and the indi- 
vidual members of his department for their assistance given 
the Attendance Officer in the discharge of his onerous duties; 
to Mr. J. A. Huckins and his department for their continued inter- 
est in and care for the school grounds; to the janitors for their loyal- 
ty and the interest shown in their work; and to all those who have 
contributed in any degree towards making our schools a strong- 
er and more vital force in this community. 

We have tried to think of every child as being great, at least 
potentially, and we have striven to give to each and every one 
of them, without distinction of "border or breed or birth," that 
physical, mental and moral training that shall fit him for true 
and wholesome living and for noble citizenship. To this end 
we have employed the best teachers available and kept our 
schools free from the taint of political influence. 

Whatever advance or progress has been made in these di- 
rections is due solely to the loyalty and co-operation of parents, 
teachers and school officials, and to all these I extend my heart- 
felt thanks. 

JOSEPH I. HORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



34 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



You are requested to give your closest attention to the sub- 
sidiary reports to be found on the following pages: 

Principal of the Junior High School. 
Head of Domestic Science Department. 
Head of Manual Training Department. 
Supervisor of Music. 
Supervisor of Drawing. 
Physical Instructor. 
School Physician. 
School Nurse. 
Attendance Officer. 

JOSEPH I. HORTON. 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The report of the Junior High School for 1919 will 
be very brief. Few changes have been made. The courses of 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 35 



study have remained the same as outlined in previous reports. 

During the year the pupils have made steady progress in 
their studies. There has been very little interruption this year 
as far as illness of pupils may be concerned. Some of our 
teachers, however, have been ill and we have had many sub- 
stitute teachers. 

Our Junior High School this year is very large. One hun- 
dred and fifty-five pupils have, been enrolled this past term. 
This number exceeds last year b3' forty-three. Our number 
was greatly increased the first week of December when pupils 
were promoted on trial from the sixth grades to the seventh 
and from the seventh to the eighth grades. Most of these chil- 
dren will be able to carry along the work of their new grade 
with credit to themselves. 

We have but one pupil taking Latin this year. 

Much work has been done in physical training. During 
the fall term when the weather permitted the girls have enjoyed 
basket ball. While these girls were on the playground, others 
were engaged in folk dancing or in the regular setting-up exer- 
cises under the direction of their chosen captains. The boys, 
also, have their captains who lead them in the setting-up exer- 
cises. Many very good leaders have been found among our 
pupils. Co-operation on the part of all has been excellent. 
Those who attended our first Field Day last June will have ob- 
tained a good idea of the work along this line. 

Three subjects have had our especial attention this past 
year — mental arithmetic, oral composition and penmanship. 
The pupils have gained much power in mental arithmetic and 
oral composition. There is yet a very great deal to be done* 
The penmanship hasn't improved as much as we would like to 
have it. Many of the pupils have not acquired a free arm move- 
ment and the formation of their letters is far from good. With 
more persistent effort on part of teachers and pupils a decided 



36 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



improvement is expected. 

By visiting the annual school exhibition parents and friends 
will be able to see a sample of the work done in every subject. 

Much less has been done in club work this year. During 
the summer twelve girls carried on the work of the State Can- 
ning Club. An exhibition was held in the fall and prizes award- 
ed for the three best exhibits. Two poultry clubs were organ- 
ized — one for the spring laying contest and the other for the 
winter contest. We also had a small pig club. One of the boys 
of this club has recently received a cash prize from the State 
for his good work. This last month a bread making club has 
been formed. This club will be personally directed by one of 
our Ipswich girls who is a student at the Essex Agricultural 
School. 

On December twenty-second the members of the junior high 
school presented a "Forefathers'* entertainment in Manning Hall. 

The program consisted of music, compositions, recitations, 
dialogues and a drill. A wonderful school spirit was manifest- 
ed by the pupils in the preparation of this entertainment. As 
a result every child acquitted himself with credit. The presence 
of many of the parents and friends of the pupils was very grat- 
ifying. The preparation of a program of this nature necessi- 
tates much work, both on the part of pupils and teachers, It 
would have been much appreciated if each child had been en- 
couraged by the presence of some member of his family. 

In the early part of the year pupil government was tried in the 
school. It proved very successful. In most cases pupils showed 
good judgment in the selection of their officers, and on the 
other hand the officers proved themselves able and efficient 
managers. The offending pupils always received their punish- 
ment in a friendly manner. This kind of discipline trained the 
children to become more watchful of themselves and to be 
more trustworthy and self-reliant. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 37 



During the coming year it should be the aim of every teach- 
er to inculcate into the minds of their pupils that happiness con- 
sists of feeling that they are a part of the great world plan and 
that they must lend themselves to the full measure of their ca- 
pacities each according to his abilities; that happiness consists 
of knowing right from wrong and that character is the found- 
ation of all success in life. Also teachers must cultivate a high 
feeling of patriotic pride and enthusiasm for whatever concerns 
the honor and the dignity of our country. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE F. SULLIVAN 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 



COOKING. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work in the cooking classes is planned to give 
the girls a knowledge of food material and its preparation. The 



38 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



general classes of food are studied, their composition, use in 
the body and various examples of food in each class are given. 
This work gives the girls ideas about making menus. They be- 
come interested in household tasks and are more helpful at 
home. 

In the fall of the year the townspeople sent in material to 
be canned and preserved. In this way the girls gained a prac- 
tical as well as a theorical knowledge of canning and preser- 
ving and found a ready disposal of all materials. In many 
cases the girls brought in their own fruit to be canned or made 
into jelly and this added to their interest. The vegetables 
canned were corn and tomatoes. All fall fruits were canned: 
plums, pears, apples, peaches and quinces; and conserves, mar- 
malades and jellies of various kinds were made. After the fruits 
were gone pickling was taken up and practical work was done 
along this line. 

Next the girls prepared simple and nutritious dishes which 
are suitable for breakfast. The recipes are chosen which are 
cheap and yet furnish a high food value. 

After this work dishes for luncheon and supper were made. 
Several lessons were given up to the study of bread. This is a 
very practical subject to take up but, owing to the shortness of 
the cooking periods, it is a difficult one to plan. 

The food materials which are used in the class are studied 
with regard to their origin and preparation for market. The 
course is not planned wholly on the meal basis system, for this 
does not prove economical or practical. The food principles 
and various ways of cooking have to be considered, and food 
left from the day before must be used up, if the child is taught 
economy. 

Instruction in housekeeping is correlated with cooking. 
Dish-washing, sweeping, cleaning, washing of dish towels is a 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 39 



lesson. The girls take turns being housekeepers and have 

these special duties to perform. 

One afternoon of each week after school hours the High 
School girls are given instruction in cooking. The work is 

along the same lines as that in the grades, but is somewhat more 
advanced. The time is short, so that the actual cooking of 

certain dishes which require much time has to be omitted. 

All work done in this department is of a practical nature 
and aims to make the girls neat, capable and economical house- 
keepers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION BROWN. 



SEWING. 

To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir:— 

The work in the Sewing Department is planned to 
teach the girls the fundamental stitches and how to apply them 
on simple garments. The girls are taught the use of commer- 
cial patterns, the planning and cutting of material in the most 
economical way. Comparison is made between home-made 
and ready-made clothing with regard to durability and econ- 
omy. 

The work is begun in the fifth grade. The child learns the 
stitches on a practice-piece and then applies them on the article 
she is making. Bean bags or iron holders are made first, then 
school bags or sewing bags. On these articles the child learns 
all the plain stitches. Then she may make some simple gar- 
ment that she needs. The need and capability of the child is 



40 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



always considered. Some girls, even in the fifth grade, have 
helped with the sewing at home and are able to make quite dif- 
ficult articles of clothing. They would lose interest if required 
to make simple things, and so it is impossible to keep all the 
class working on the same article. Two fifth grade girls are 
now busy on simple dresses for themselves. 

In the sixth grade one small article is made by hand. There 
the child may use the sewing machine on the long seams of her 
other garments. It takes much time and patience to learn to 
stitch straight. Nightgowns, princess slips, bloomers, petticoats 
and aprons of different kinds are made in this grade. 

In the seventh grade the girls have but one half year of 
sewing. They get more practice in the use of the machines 
while making their cooking outfits which consist of an apron, 
cap, towel and holder. This class has also done work sent in 
by townspeople. Repair work and darning is taught, garments 
being brought from home to be repaired. 

In the eighth grade the work is more advanced. Various 
articles of clothing are made including underwear, blouses, dres- 
ses and skirts. 

The High School girls have two periods a week of sewing. 
I hey are able to sew with very little instruction and much of 
their work is done at home. They are allowed to make any ar- 
ticle of clothing that they need. In many cases they sew for others 
in their family. They may do fancy work just before Christ- 
mas and many of their Christmas presents are made in the sew- 
ing room. 

This year the girls in the Candlewood and Linebrook 
schools have been given instruction in sewing. The class meets 
every two weeks. They seem very interested in the work and 
are doing very well for beginners. They have made bean bags 
or iron holders and now are working on a simple undergarment 
or apron. 



fPSWlCH SCHOOL REPORT. 41 



This course aims to teach the girls to make and repair their 
own clothes. Many girls who find it hard to learn from books 
are very clever with their hands. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION BROWN. 



MUSIC. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

In accordance with your request, I am submitting a 
report of the music department of the Ipswich Public Schools. 

The methods employed and the books and course of study 
in use at the present time are the same as last year. 

The music in the grades and also in the High School is pro- 
gressing most satisfactorily. Concerts were given by the Junior 
High and also the Glee Club of the Senior High last year, and 
the interest shown seemed to be rather more than in previous 
years. The girls of the High School conducted a tag-day, for 
the purpose of obtaining money to purchase a bronze tablet, 
containing the names of the High School alumni who took part 



42 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



in the World War. As this did not net us enough to obtain the 
tablet, the money received from the proceeds of the comic opera 
Captain Crossbones" will be donated to this purpose also. May 
I say just a word in regard to the opera? 

Great credit should be give our High School pupils for at- 
tempting such an elaborate production, as nothing of the kind 
has ever before been presented by our boys and girls. With the 
great amount of interest shown, it promises to be a success. 

In closing, may I offer a few suggestions for the betterment 
of the music in our schools. 

1 That three periods a week be devoted to music in the 
Junior High instead of two as at present. 

2 That the music period be changed from the last period of 
the day, to the first period in the morning, the only logical time 
for music study. This should apply to all grades. 

3 That two periods a week be granted the High School 
for music instead of one as at present, If necessary, the periods 
could be made shorter than at present. 

4 That the study of harmony and theory be introduced into 
the High School. Also one period of music appreciation each 
week. 

5 Credit for outside music study should be granted to any 
pupil who desires the same, following the course of study re- 
commended by the director of music. May I ask your very 
careful consideration of the latter? The above suggestions would 
be of the utmost value to our pupils. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR HAROLD TOZER. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 43 



DRAWING. 



1 o the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

It gives me pleasure to submit my first report on the 
Art Work in the schools of Ipswich since September, 1919. 

In the first four grades, the progressive method of drawing, 
outlined by the Massachusetts Normal Art School, has been 
used since my work began in the schools of Ipswich. The pur- 
pose of this method is to develop the pencil habit, that is, the 
power to draw freely and fluently forms of practical utility 
which the majority of people find it useful to represent. The 
aim is to build up a serviceable vocabulary, so to speak, for use 
at all times, when we have to draw from memory without the 
aid of models. It is impossible to teach the children to draw 
all the needed forms. This descriptive drawing is wholly de- 
pendent upon the memory images that we have stored away. 
In selecting the forms to memorize for our graphic vocabulary, 
we find that the majority of things are built upon the rectangle, 
square, triangle, and circle. The house, barn, and furnishings 
are really made on the type forms and their modifications. If 
the typical form is memorized and can be turned in any position 
without reference to the model, that is, if the form is really a 



44 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



part of the pupil's own mental furniture, it is an easy matter for 
him to add the details and complete the story. 

In the two upper grades and in the junior high, the per- 
spective drawing is taught and I hope to take up elementary 
construction drawing and simple working drawings in the jun- 
ior high, preparatory to more advanced work m the high 
school. 

Color work and nature painting are taken up in the fall and 
spring. 

The materials used in the Art Work in the grades are pen- 
cil, crayons, brush and ink, and water colors. 

In the high school, the perspective principles are carried 
out in a more advanced form in the freshman freehand drawing 
class. In the sophomore, junior, and senior freehand drawing 
classes, shaded work has been taught in both pencil and char- 
coal. The Committee has furnished us with some very fine 
casts which the pupils are working from with very great inter- 
est. 

Principles of design will be taken up and applied in mak- 
ing different things in leather, such as pocket books, scissors 
cases, etc. 

The work in mechanical drawing includes geometric prob- 
lems, working drawings, and sectional views, in preparation for 
technical schools. 

In closing I wish to thank the Superintendent and the School 
Committee for their sincere support, and the teachers for their 
co-operation and willingness in carrying oi»t the lesson plans. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANNA L. NASON. 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 45 



MANUAL TRAINING. 






To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

The work of this department has been continued 
along the same general lines as those of last year. 

At the beginning of the fall term it became necessary to en- 
large the plant to the limit of capacity in order to accommo- 
date the increasing number of pupils. The work-benches were 
taken up and rearranged with a view to giving the best possible 
working conditions to a maximum number of pupils to a class. 
New benches with their equipment of tools were purchased 
and put in place. Additional drop-lights were installed, so that 
each bench has the proper amount of light. Under the new 

arrangement all the floor space has been most economically 
utilized and meets fairly well the requirements of sanitary and 
healthful working conditions. Lack of heat in extremely cold 
weather is our only draw-back. 

The first year's work in this department is beset with many 
difficulties. The work is new to the pupil and he is apt to look 
upon it as some form of recreation or play. We have to teach 
him at the outset that manual training is a subject that develops 
the mind and gives skill to the hand at one and the same time, 



46 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



and requires as close attention to the directions given as does 
the solution of a problem in arithmetic. And not until the pu- 
pil realizes that he must concentrate his thought upon the work 
in hand can we expect anything but poor results. When he 
gets the proper control of his mind and uses it in connection 
with his work, then he begins to progress. 

This is what we try to impress upon the pupil at the start 
and, therefore, we endeavor to hold all preliminary work up to 
a good standard of accuracy. He must learn where to draw 

his line, or mark, and must understand why it is placed there; 
and then he must try to work to it, not play to it. 

We have also tried to have the pupils understand the value 
of the material they are using. The first cost of . the stock or 
lumber they get from the purchase slip, and to this they can 
add the labor cost, which gives them the real cost of the article 
made. Waste of material or time is not permitted, and work 
must be completed at the required time. Some pupils work 
faster than others, but the amount of work is not so great but 
what the average boy can complete it before the close of the 
period, if he pays proper attention to what is given him to do. 

We have tried to be as economical with the use of material 
as possible, although lumber of all kinds has advanced in price 
from 200 to 400 per cent, since 1915. You will find by refer- 
ring to lumber bills of that year that this year's bill will not ex- 
ceed that of the year mentioned. 

Our aim has been to have the pupils make a practical ap- 
plication of the subjects taught in the grades. The careful 
measurements which we must insist upon, give them a knowl- 
edge of the uses of arithmetic, and the same is true of drawing. 
And with the co-operation of the grade teachers, we feel that 
this training will assist the boy to become a better student and 
a better citizen. 

So far the work has been confined to the making of simple 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 41 



articles of practical use absolutely by hand. Only on very special 
occasions do we make use of the machines for work which the 
boys themselves can do. Every sample of work for which they 
are credited is the work of their hands under supervision. The 
laying out, marking, sawing, planing, jointing and beveling are 
required to be done by the pupils themselves, and must come 
up to a certain standard of accuracy, by frequent repetition if 
necessary, before they can pass on to the next piece of work. 

If the work begun here in the lower grades could be con- 
tinued through the remaining grades and the high school we 
should have some very good specimens of workmanship to 
exhibit. 

In closing let me say that we have about 1 75 boys taking 
work in this department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. GOULD. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

In submitting my second annual report as director of 



48 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



physical education in the Public Schools of Ipswich I would 
gratefully acknowledge the hearty co-operation of yourself and 
the principals and teachers of the High School and the Gram- 
mar and Primary Schools. 

The daily setting up drill in the Junior High School de- 
serves particular mention. In this school the teachers, under 
the able guidance of the principal, have developed a splendid 
set of leaders. This is one of decided social as well as physi- 
cal training value, and will in time head a general system of 
self-management in Physical Education and in Play and Recre- 
ation. 

The prescribed system of exercises, games and dances is 
now well advanced in the Winthrop and the Burley Schools, 
and here also pupils are gradually trained in leadership. 

I shall dwell at some length upon the educational value of 
developing pupil leadership in the Public Schools. I brought 
this system to the attention of the National Physical Education 
Society at their Annual Conference last spring, and find that it 
meets with heartiest approval of specialists, as well as of the 
leaders in American Education. I hope, therefore, that it will 
be possible for us to get better results in the Senior High School, 
but this is only possible if every member of the High School 
faculty is in accord with this idea, and they consequently aid 
heartily in the training of pupil leaders. 

The dearth of child leaders in our present day meagre 
child-play-world is generally admitted by all educational ex- 
perts, and the last annual National Convention urged that group 
activities and self-management ought to be extended into all 
our school affairs. 

"In the past, leaders originated ideas, they initiated move- 
ments, they gathered a following about them, they trained them 
to their point of view, and they created new conditions, new 
opportunities and new institutions." 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 49 



"The group followed leadership with eagerness and later 
learned discrimination. Frequently different leaders lead in 

different activities." 

"In the traditions of primitive society it is a divinity or a 
hero who founds the city, establishes laws, settles government, 
wins wars, or invents writings, music, dances and games." 

Thomas Carlyle in his "Heroes and Hero worship" shows 
this. 

"The generic view of modern society minimizes the value 
of individual leadership. We see that governments and relig- 
ions grow, and they cannot go far ahead of the development of 
the people. The degree of economic determination also limits 
both the group and its leaders." 

-. We have also learned how tradition gathers around per- 
sonality, blending under one name the virtues and the acts of 
many people. And yet we recognize that individual variants 
may give us leaders of incalculable value for all the purposes of 
life. 

What makes Leadership? 

The leader must have courage, even daring, a strong will 
and self esteem, for he must be able to stand alone. He must 
have vision and inventiveness, for he must lead the way. 

He must have a keen sense of the values in others, that he 
may select able assistants. 

He leads through affirmation, repetition, and contagion. 

Loyalty Among Children. 

In their weakness and absence of sense of law, and with 
their strong gregarious instinct, children naturally attach them- 
selves strongly to persons. They love to lead and they love to 
follow. Leadership with them, as with savages, is largely a 
matter of strength, The boy who can lick the others, jump far- 
ther, or do more daring things, becomes captain. 



50 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Intellectual supremacy counts for little. Discipline is main- 
tained mainly by force or fear, though if the leader has a sense 
of fair play it helps him in the long run. 

Leadership Through Prestige. 

About the age of twelve, various forms of what we may 
call made-up leadership becomes important. Social position 
begins to be recognized. Wealth, and the possession of a fine 
home, servants, and carriages, may give a child an enviable po- 
sition. A little later, the way one wears his clothes, his man- 
ners, intellectual ability, or marked self-control give him a posi- 
tion of prominence. 

Two Kinds of Leaders in America. 

The masses admire strenuous characters who bluster and 
who deliver the goods, the political boss. 

The more intelligent class admires and follows intelligent, 
self-controlled and devoted men. 

A democracy must work to increase this second class. 

Here we have the mental, moral and social significance of 
the value of stimulating pupil leaders in physical education. 
What an opportunity in turning our teachers from mere teach- 
ers of physical stunts into organizers of an efficient play-world 
of children, from mere lecturers of personal hygiene into engi- 
neers of psycho-physical happiness! 

Remember that the instincts for fundamental motor activ- 
ities which lead to psycho-physical efficiency are within most nor- 
mal children, and that we cannot merely look upon our public 
schools as asylums for abnormal children who need remedial 
treatment. 

Remember that modern schooling is to blame for many of 
our children's ailments, but that we ought still to think of our 
schools as mainly inhabited by normal children whose healthy 
normal development we must safeguard. Let us think out 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 51 



more preventative measures and less about corrective sys- 
tems. 

But here we have also the physical significance of the value 
of promoting pupil leadership in physical education, because a 
child's fundamental faculty of learning is imitation, and it is 
much better for him to imitate the vigorous, graceful, normal and 
childlike poise of his mates than the fancy and age-handicapped 
contortions of us teachers. 

There is a questionable stimulation of the imitative sense of 
children, of the deep knee bend, stoop standing, stretch stride 
standing example of the average school teacher who is becom- 
ingly dressed in semi-modified modern shoes, skirt and silk 
waist. 

Let us point out against such doubtful physical example, 
the wonderful possibilities which will develop if these same 
very capable pedagogues and experts of child nature would de- 
vote their time to finding among the strong and vigorous, and 
the straight and graceful, those children who have the elements 
of good leaders in their mental and physical machinery and 
then train these for self-controlled and devoted leadership. 

All this can be done in every class room by organizing six 
to eight groups. This can be developed further by the help of 
school yards and playgrounds, and by gardening, and excur- 
sions into woods and fields; not only in formal gymnastics, as a 
part of our medicine which we modern people must learn to 
take, but in games and play, in teams and clubs, in Scouting 
and gardening, in hiking and marching. 

These germs planted in the daily sessions in the school 
room will germinate in the play world, in the home and back 
yards and the playgrounds. 

Even if we have a specialist of a broad system of motor- 
izing and socializing our children in every city school building, 
unless this specialist develops pupil leadership, he cannot have 



52 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



effective hygienic practice daily in every school, but at most can 
have only two exercises a week in the gymnasium. This may 
be good as far as it goes but it can at best be only academic 
regimentation. 

I invite the teachers to become organizers of groups and to 
become master-teachers. Learn to recognize born leaders and 
learn the fascination of training leadership and the psycho-phy- 
sical and social significance of pupil leadership. 

Teach ideals just ahead of the group, teach heroes daring- 
ly, "a diamond with a flaw is better than a perfect pebble.'* 
Recognize leadership in the home and in the school. Give it 
its head; give it opportunity for expression through varied or- 
ganizations, especially with fundamental and instinctive motor 
activities. 

Emphasize general excellency; moral excellence may give 
us prigs; intellectual ability may make exploiters, physical 
strength may make brutes. 

Work for character; praise it; and give it room to act. 

In closing 1 would like to recall to your attention the suc- 
cess of our First Annual School Field Day. I have held many 
such affairs in all parts of Massachusetts. This one was a great 
success and much of it was due to the splendid co-operation of 
public spirited citizens of Ipswich. I know that such affairs 

promote friendship and community loyalty and the schools 
should annually promote a number of such festivals. 

Respecfully submitted, 

ERNST HERMANN, 

Director of Physical Education. 



IPSWfCH SCHOOL REPORT. 53 



SCHOOL NURSE. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

I respectfully submit the following report of this de- 
partment for the year 1919: 

School Visits 239 
Home Visits 1 126 
Children taken to Dental Clinic 197 
(120 children were actually taken, but some had extra visits.) 
Children taken to Occulist 7 
Assisted Dr. with Physical Examinations 9 1 1 
Children weighed, measured and exam- 
ined by Nurse 987 
Class Room Inspections 9600 
Many Health Talks have been made. 
Contagious Diseases: Mumps 84 

Scarlet Fever I 8 

Diphtheria 5 

Pneumonia 2 

Whooping Cough 2 

Chicken Pox 18 

Miscellaneous: Tonsil an Adenoid Op. 26 

Appendicitis 4 

Broken Arms 5 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTHA J. STEWART. 



54 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



ATTENDANCE REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1919: 

I have investigated such cases as were reported to me and 
found the pupils absent for the following reasons: 



Sickness 


118 


Kept out by parents 


73 


Truants 


47 


Lack of clothing, shoes, etc. 


34 


Found on street and taken to school 


29 


Cases in court 


3 


Left town 


8 


Found at home and taken to school 


23 



335 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE W. TOZER, 

Attendance Officer. 



HONORABLE MENTION. 

Miss Annie P. Wade's school has the honor of having two 
pupils who have not been absent, tardy, nor dismissed for the 
entire year. There names are John Michon and Dorothy Will- 
comb. They may well be proud of their perfect attendance 
record. 






IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



55 



SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 




Term 



Begins 



CI 



oses 



Winter 


January 5 


February 27 


Spring 


March 8 


April 30 


Summer 


May 10 


June 25 


Fall 


September 8 


December 24 



Teachers must report for duty on Tuesday, September 7, 
at 9 a.m., one day previous to the opening ot school for the 
fall term. 



Holidays. 

Every Saturday; Columbus Day, October 12; Wednesday 
Afternoon, Thursday and Friday of Thanksgiving Week; Jan- 
uary 1; February 22; April 19; Memorial Day; June 17; and 
Good Friday. 



56 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



^MIIIIIIIUIIUUUUIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIUH 



No School Signals 



OF 



tKlje Spsforirf) public g>d)oote I 

f o& I 

4 blasts at 7.30-No MORNING SES- 1 

| SION in any school. I 

4 blasts at 8.00— No MORNING SES- § 

SION in the first five I 

l grades. § 

4 blasts at 11.00-No AFTERNOON ! 

SESSION in any | 

school. | 

4 blasts at 11. 30-No AFTERNOON I 

SESSION in the first | 

five grades. 1 

C&<3 | 

In the absence of any signal at I 1 .00 | 

or 1 1.30, the afternoon session will be I 

held as usual. Teachers and pupils must | 

be present at such sessions as on other j 

1 days. 1 

All should bear in mind that the 7.30 | 

and 8.00 o'clock signals do not excuse | 

for the entire day. | 

^^^yiutiivrtfiffffttnfiiiiiriitrifririiiiiiifiifntifiiiitiiiiiiiiiitriiiffrffiftiirffHtfniitfiiiiiiiuiiitifiiitifiiiiitiiiiiiitucvi^^ 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 57 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



We have taken these tables of vital statistics from copies 
furnished us N by our Town Clerk, Mr. Charles W. Bamford. In 
every case persons born in any of the British Provinces, Ireland, 
Scotland or Wales have been excluded. It will be seen from 
the table that the number of foreign fathers has increased 100 
per cent since 1912. 

Births. 







Foreign 


Foreign 


Year 


Number 


Fathers 


Mothers 


1912 


159 


57 


59 


1913 


146 


62 


62 


1914 


144 


75 


75 


1915 


118 


55 


57 


1916 


168 


99 


100 


1917 


149 


82 


78 


1918 


182 


109 


107 


1919 


195 


114 


112 



58 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Forty-Fifth Annual Commencement 

OF THE 

Manning High School, Class of 1919 

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1919. 



Program. 

Invocation Rev. William A. Wood 

School Chorus 

"Rest in Peace" £A£evin 

Salutatory Cora Henrietta Benedix 

A Stone to the House of Life 

Essay Spencer Whitcomb King 

After the Whirlwind, the Still Small Voice 

School Glee Club 

"Shout Aloud in Triumph" Manned 

Class History Georgia Eliza Reid 

Valedictory Edith Mable Spyut 

Ad Astra Per Aspera 

Address Dr. Kenneth C M. Sills 

President Bowdoin College 

Presentation of Diplomas Herbert W. Mason 

Chairman School Committee 

School Chorus 

"When the Flag Goes By" ZACevin 

Benediction 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 59 



CLASS OF 1919. 



CLASS OFFICERS. 

Spencer Whitcomb King President 

Ethelinda Tucker Vice-President 

Georgia Eliza Reid Secretary 

Samuel Francis Gordon Treasurer 

COLLEGE COURSE. 
Lucy Burnham Sturgis Ethelinda Tucker 

William Emerson Tucker Clarice Madeline Davison 

Myrtle Estelle Goditt Georgia Eliza Reid 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 
Chester Anthony Everett Douglas Jewett 

Cleon Bancroft Johnson Spencer Whitcomb King 

NORMAL COURSE. 
Ellen Francis Margaret O'Brien Gladys May Brown 

Thelma Damon Margaret Theresa Reilly 

GENERAL COURSE. 
Samuel Francis Gordon Austin Robinson Caverly 

Althea Veronica Hayes Marion Elizabeth Phillips 

COMMERCIAL COURSE. 
George Herbert Mayes Lucy Lauriat Bailey 

Bessie May Chapman Mildred Katherine Davis 

Susie Maria Dewar Ada Emily Hobert 

Elsie Elizabeth Jones Edith Mable Spyut 

Cora Henrietta Benedix 



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IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 61 



LIST of TEACHERS 

- — IN THE 

Ipswich Public Schools. 



John P. Marston High School 

Ralph C. Whipple 

Lois E. Mann 

Evelyn C. Silva 

Elizabeth C. Ferguson 

Elizabeth M. Wood 

Miriam F. Cushman 

Helen M. Sanby 

Katherine F. Sullivan Winthrop 

S. Isabelle Arthur 

L. Eva Stearns 

Emma Bell 

Leroy W. Jackman 

Helen M. Anderson 

Mrs. William Fisher 

Mabel V. Ladd 

Eva A. Willcomb 



62 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Hazel M. Weare 
Marion P. Webster 
Nellie Sullivan 
Lydia S. Harris 

Ethel W. Archer 
Amy Stanford 

Grace M. Bowlen 
Frances Trussel 

L. Ardell Kimball 
Annie P. Wade 

Elizabeth A. Caldwell 
Mrs. Leslie Millard 

Myrtle H. Cunningham 

Mrs. Augusta Greenache 

Ruth F. Joyce 

Cora H. Jewett 

Marion E. Brown 

Anna L. Nason 
Arthur H. Tozer 

Ernst Hermann 

Joseph I. Horton 



Burley 



Portable 

it 

Payne 

Dennison 
<< 

Cogswell 
<( 

Candlewood 

Wainwright 

Linebrook 

Grape Island 

Domestic Science 

Drawing 
Music 

Physical Director 

Superintendent 



Auditor's Report. 

To the Citizens of Ipswich: 

I herewith submit the Annual Report 
of the Heard and Treadwell Funds as compiled from the books 
of the Treasurer of the Trustees. I have found receipts for all 
bills paid and I have examined the various Stocks and Bonds 
of which these funds are composed and have found them to 
agree with the reports submitted. There is no report of the 
Manning School and R. H. Manning Funds because, owing to 
the illness of the Treasurer of these funds, I have been unable 
to audit these accounts. 

FREDERICK S. WITHAM, 

Auditor. 
February 11, 1920. 



64 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Heard Fund of Ipswich Public Library. 



Income: 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1919 $ 305 29 

Received from investments 2245 24 

Received from Treadwell Fund 800 00 

$3350 53 

Expenditures: 

Salaries $1058 69 

Insurance and miscellaneous expenses 744 27 

Balance on hand January I, 1920 1547 57 

$3350 53 

• NOTE. — Expenditures cover a period of 1 3 months, as the 
report of last year ended December 1 , while this year it in- 
cludes payments to January 1, 1920. 

Securities Comprising Heard Fund. 

33 shares B & L RR, preferred stock 

35 shares B&MRR 

1 shares Fitchburg RR, preferred stock 

1 share C B & RR, 3 1-2 percent bond 

1 United Electric & Power bond 

3 Northern Pacific Great Northern 4 per cent bonds 

1 Aurora Elgin & Chicago bond 

3 Quincy Gas & Electric bonds 

1 Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern bond 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 



$5846 00 


1470 00 


900 00 


945 00 


950 00 


2830 00 


1000 00 


3000 00 


1000 00 


216 64 


$18157 64 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



65 



Treadwell Fund. 



Income: 
Cash on hand January 1, 1919 
Received from investments 



Expenditures: 



Sal 



alaries 



Miscellaneous expenses 
Transferred to Heard Fund 
Balance paid on Liberty Bond 
Balance on hand January 1, 1920 



$ 11028 


2773 24 


$2883 52 


$ 50 00 


451 47 


800 00 


253 43 


1328 62 



$2883 52 



Securities Comprising Treadwell Fund. 



50 shares Fitchburg RR, preferred stock 

30 shares Old Colony RR, preferred stock 

25 shares B & P RR, preferred stock 

25 shares Me Central RR, preferred 

25 shares Vt & Mass RR, preferred stock 

25 shares B & A RR, preferred stock 



$4500 00 
5215 00 
6300 00 
3080 00 
3460 00 
3990 00 



66 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



1 City of Fostoria, Ohio, 4 per cent bond 

I American Tel & Tel Co, 4 per cent bond 

1 Aurora Elgin & Chicago RR, 5 per cent bond 

1 Kansas Gas & Electric, 5 per cent bond 

1 Quincy Gas & Electric Heating, 5 " 



1 Quincy Gas & Electric Heating, 5 per cent bond 
1 Waterloo Cedar Falls & Northern bond 

1 Missouri Pacific RR bond 

2 Liberty Bonds 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 
Deposited in Salem Savings Bank 



530 00 


1 000 00 


1000 00 


1000 00 


950 00 


1000 00 


1000 00 


1000 00 


825 78 


750 00 


$35600 78 



Thomas H. Lord Fund 



1 Liberty Bond 
Income from same 



$1000 00 
57 40 

$1057 40 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 67 



Brown School Fund. 



February 3, 1920. 
The Trustees of the Brown School Fund present the follow- 
ing report for the year 1919: 

The funds are as follows: 
Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank $1386 48 

Deposited in Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 1124 59 

$2511 07 

Income since last report: 
Dividend from Ipswich Savings Bank $54 80 

Dividend from Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 49 80 

$104 60 

Expenditures for the year: 
Paid in part, salary of Candlewood teacher, two months $90 00 

Balance $14 60 

Respectfully submitted, 

A STORY BROWN ) 
CHARLES G. BROWN [ Trustees 
BENJ. R. HORTON ) 

Ipswich, Mass., February 4, 1920. 
I hereby certify that I have this day audited the receipts and expenditures 
of the Brown School Fund and find that the same are correct as shown 
by the above report. FREDERICK S. WITHAM, Auditor. 



68 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Burley Education Fund. 



The Trustees of the Burley Education Fund present here- 
with their ninety-fourth Annual Report: 

The funds in their hands are as follows: 

In Ipswich Savings Bank $3387 33 

Caldwell fund in Ipswich Savings Bank 1 1 50 05 

In Salem Savings Bank 1676 44 

In Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 2070 03 

Fifteen shares, common, B & M Railroad stock 540 00 

Liberty bonds, second issue, converted 700 00 

Liberty bond, fourth issue 1 000 00 



Income for the year 1919 has been as follows: 
From Ipswich Savings Bank 
From Caldwell Fund 
From Salem Savings Bank 
From Salem Five Cents Savings Bank 
From Liberty bonds, second issue 
Erom Liberty bonds, fourth issue 
From Town Note 

$404 70 
Expenditure has been thirty-six cents, incident to conver- 
sion of Liberty Bonds. 

FRANK T. GOODHUE 
JOSEPH T. MORTON 
GEORGE W. TOZER 
JOHN W. NOURSE 

Ipswich, Mass., January 16, 1920. 
I hereby certify that I have this day audited the receipts and expenditures 
of the Burley Education Fund and find that the same are correct as shown 
by the above report. FREDERICK S. W1THAM, Auditor. 



$10523 85 


$128 64 


44 64 


41 27 


90 07 


30 63 


41 45 


28 00 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 69 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



1918-1919. 
Property in the hands of the Feoffees as follows: 

Little Neck, valued at $5000 00 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank 7974 90 

Deposited in Ipswich Savings Bank (Essex School 

Farm) 1681 58 

Income and receipts since the last report as follow: 
From land rent at Little Neck 
Taxes from cottage owners, Little Neck 
From Ipswich Savings Bank 
Interest on deposits, Ipswich Savings Bank 

Disbursements: 

Rees Jenkins, labor 
Joseph A Beaulieu, labor 
J P Marston, salary 
L A Peabody, labor 
Canney Lumber Co., lumber 
Joseph A King, repairs 
Justin Hull, labor 
Ipswich Chronicle, printing 
C F Chapman & Son, barrel 
Ipswich Mills, repairs 



$1720 00 


1172 25 


545 98 


376 82 


$3615 05 


$381 35 


164 66 


410 00 


11 12 


45 90 


16 79 


6 00 


2 00 


5 25 


2 00 



70 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



Damon & Damon, insurance 

Envelopes 

John W Goodhue, sundries 

F F Byron 

Town of Ipswich, taxes 

Town of Ipswich, water 

Treasurer's salary 

G H W Hayes, legal opinion 

Ipswich Savings Bank, deposit 

Income over expenses 



Amount due for land rent at Little Neck 
Amount due for taxes from cottages owners 

GEORGE E. FARLEY, Treasurer. 



$ 111 50 


3 93 


15 61 


11 00 


1610 68 


10 88 


100 00 


5 00 


376 82 


258 56 


$3615 05 


$912 00 


691 09 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 71 



Department of Medical Inspection and Hygiene. 



Report of the School Physician. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, 

Ipswich, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

An intensive study of the problems with which this 
department has to deal has been carried on the past year. This 
study applied to our school system as a whole shows that much 
constructive work has been undertaken, and that along certain 
lines the results obtained are very gratifying. 

But it must be admitted that there is much yet to be done 
before the children in our schools will attain that degree of 
bodily vigor so necessary as a basis upon which to build all that 
should be built upon their potential mentality. 

A careful examination of 962 children showed 367 to be 
under weight. A large proportion of these under-weights are 
shown to be under nourished, although they showed no evi- 
dence of organic disease. These were found to be 38.14 per 
cent, underweight, which is about the same percentage as was 
found among the young men examined for military service 
during the late war. Examinations in other places have re- 
vealed about the same condition, even Brookline where condi- 
tions of living are supposed to be of the best, furnishing a large 
percentage of underweights. 



72 IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 



I feel that physical training has done much for our boys 
and girls, and it is in that field that we may confidently look for 
greater results in building up good physiques for our children. 
Splendid work has been done there and it should be more in- 
tensively developed. I hope everyone will read carefully and 
ponder upon the report of Mr. Hermann, the physical director. 
Ipswich is most fortunate in having this work done under his 
direction. 

Governor Coolidge in his last message to the legislature, 
recognizing the general prevalence of this minimum standard of 
health among the children in this Commonwealth, points out 
what he believes to be the duty of the public schools. Here is 
what he says: 

Along with economy of resources should go conservation 
of the public health. The physical well-being of a people is 
the foundation of all advancement. Lack of bodily vigor is the 
beginning of a State's decadence in all things. With a people 
in a sound physical condition, all things are possible. Great 
progress has been made in medical science and skill, and relief 
has been found from many of the terrors of disease. But too 
little attention has been given to full bodily development, which 
after all is not a matter of accident, of heredity or environment, 
but of intelligent training. This work should be attacked with 
great vigor in all our schools. We cannot breed a race of weak- 
lings and hope to survive in any of the world competitions. 

"It has, besides, a moral aspect. The unsound social and 
economic theories which deluge the earth from time to time are 
not the progeny of stalwart men and women. Sound bodies do 
not breed that kind of unsound doctrines. Along with a vigor- 
ous training for physical development should go a teaching to 
think healthful thoughts. For, after all, it must be remembered 
that 'as a man thinketh in his heart, so is he." 

The suggestions contained in the above, coming from such 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 73 



a source, should receive the careful consideration of all our 
people, and the school authorities should take measures to see 
that the children receive the instruction and training in health 
promotion to which they are entitled. 

On the whole the health of the children has been good. 
I fail to find in the death returns for the year the names of any 
children registered in our schools. This shows that the children 
who are underweight and undernourished may be built up in 
health and vigor by intelligent training and health supervision. 
Something of this kind was evidently in the Governor's mind 
when he pointed out in his message what he conceived to be 
the duty of the public schools. 

The report of the school nurse shows that she did a vast 
amount of work which involved an immense amount of detail, 
and I know that she worked on this detail a great many hours 
that for her own good she should have devoted to recreation. 
I hope the public will appreciate as it should, this important vol- 
untary service. Had it not been rendered, the deductions I 
have made for this department would not have been possible. 
I shall not discuss these deductions in this report but shall try to 
point out to the school authorities what they show to me with 
the hope that larger results will be obtained the coming year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. MacARTHUR, 

School Physician. 
Ipswich, February 1, 1920. 



74 iPSWrCH.: SCHOOL fiEPORT. 



INDEX. 



Organization of School Committee Page 3 

Financial Statement 4 

Report of School Committee 5 

Report of Superintendent 9 

Domestic Science Department 14 

Manual Training 1 5 

Underweight Pupils 1 5 

School Exhibition 1 7 

Field Day 18 

Rural Schools 19 

Night School 19 

Repairs and Improvements 2 1 

Salaries 22 

Recommendations 23 

Penny Savings 24 

General 25 

Abstract of School Laws 27 

Budget 3 1 

Acknowledgments 32 

Junior High School 34 

Domestic Science: 

Cooking 37 

Sewing 39 

Music 4 1 

Drawing 43 

Manual Training 45 



IPSWICH SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

Physical Education 47 

School Nurse 53 

Attendance Report 54 

School Calendar 55 

No School Signals 56 

Vital Statistics 5 7 

Commencement Exercises 58 

Distribution of Pupils 60 

List of Teachers 61 

Auditor's Report 63 

Heard Fund 64 

Treadwell Fund 65 

Thomas H Lord Fund 66 

Brown School Fund 67 

Burley Education Fund 68 

Feoffees' Report 69 

Repor of School Physician 7 1 



*\ 






%»i# 



WARRANT FOR 




Annual Town Meeting 



Essex, ss. 

To Clifford C. Boylan, Constable of the Town of Ipswich, in 
said County, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 

are hereby directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of 

Ipswich, qualified to vote in town affairs, to meet at the Town 

Hall, in said Ipswich, on 

Monday, the First Day of March, 1920, 

at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz: 

ft 

Article I. To choose a Moderator to -preside in said meeting 

Article 2. To fix the compensation of Town Officers. 

Article 3. To choose the following officers, viz: 
One Selectman for three years. 
One Assessor of Taxes for three years. 
One Overseer of the Poor for three years. 
Town Clerk for three years. 



Treasurer and Collector of Taxes for one year. 

Auditor for one year. 

One Water and Electric Lighting Commissioner tbi three 

years. 
Two members of the School Committee for three years. 
One member of the Board of Health for three years. 
Constable for one year. 

One Superintendent of Cemeteries for three years. 
One Park Commissioner for three years. 
One Clam Commissioner for three years. 

Also to vote YES or NO upon the following question: 
"Shall license be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this town?" 

The above named officers and question to be voted for upon 
one ballot on iMONDAY, the EIGHTH DAY of MARCH, 1 920. 

The polls will be open at 6-15 o'clock A.M. and may be 
closed at 4-45 o'clock P.M. 

Article 4. To choose all other necessary Town Officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the report of the Finance 
Committee, and raise and appropriate money for town charges 
for the ensuing year. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in 
anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 7, To seejf the town will appoint the Collector of 
taxes an agent of the town to collect all bills due the town. 

Article 8. To hear and act upon the reports of Trustees, Com- 
mittees and 1 own Officers. 

Article 9. To see if the town will authorize the Water and 
Electric Lighting Commissioner:; to exiend the water system to 
such parts of the town as may be desired, and provide for the 
payment thereof. 

Article 10. To see if the tosvn will authorize t'h er and 

Electric Lighting Commissioners to extend ei her the street or 
commercial lighting, and provide for the payment thereof. 



Article I I. To see if the town will fix the date when taxes 
shall become due and payable. 

Article 12. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money not to exceed 5 per cent, of the tax levy of the year 
1919, to be known as the Reserve Fund. 

Article 1 3. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the observance of Memorial Day, and provide for the 
payment thereof. 

Article 14. To see if the town will set apart a-plot of land in 
Highland Cemetery to be laid out for a lot for the burial of Sol- 
diers, Marines and Sailors of the United States Army and Navy. 

Article 1 5. To see what action the town will take to improve 
the sanitary conditions of the Payne and Cogswell Schools, and 
provide for the payment thereof. 

Article 1 6. To see if the town will take any action in regard 
to providing transportation facilities by means of Street Rail- 
ways or otherwise. 

Article 1 7. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to provide band concerts, and provide for the payment 
thereof. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appoint a committee to 
investigate the vault conditions in Town Hall. 

Article 19. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money to build a new road bed the entire length of Argilla 
Road, and provide for the payment thereof. 

Article 20. To see if the town will appoint a Committee to 
consider the possibility of acquiring the top of Town Hill for a 
public park. 

Article 21. To see if the town will accept the provisions of 
Chapter 23, General Acts of 1917, which provides for the li- 
censing of Coffee Houses, so-called. 

Article 22. To see what compensation will be allowed the 
members of the Fire Department for the ensuing year. 

Article 23. To see if the town will purchase an auto pump- 
ing engine or make < s in our present equipment and pro- 
vide for the payment cf the same. 



Article 24. To see if the town will purchase and install ad- 
ditional machinery and generating equipment for the Electric 
Light Department and provide for the payment of the same. 

Article 25. To see if the town will extend the water system 
through Blaisdell Ave. and provide for the payment of the 

same. 

Article 26. To see if the town will extend the electric light- 
ing system through Blaisdell Ave. and provide for the payment 
of the same.. 

Article 27. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for maintaining the Playground for the ensuing year, and 
provide for the payment thereof. 

Article 28. To ses if the town will appoint a committee to 
look into the matter of road construction, with the idea of ac- 
quiring the services of an expert if necessary, and provide for 
the payment thereof. 

Article 29. To see if the town will take any action on a bill 
before the Legislature which provides for a Public Reservation 
on Plum Island and the establishment of the Plum Island Res- 
ervation Commission. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up at- 
tested copies thereof, one at the Town House, one at the Post 
Office, and one at each of the Public Meeting Houses in said 
town, seven days at least before the time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant, with 
your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place 
of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighteenth day of February in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty. 

FRANK W. KYES ) Selectmen 

EBEN B. MOULTON of 

JOHN A. BROWN S Ipswich. 

A True Copy. 

Attest: Constable 

Ipswich, Mass., February 18, 1920. 



T OF I 

IPSV/ICH ROOM 

Ipswich Public Library 
Ipswich, Massachusetts 



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